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Flinders University crew for the Streaky Bay and Scaele Bay February 2010 Field School.

Principal Investigator

Dr. Mark Staniforth
Dr. Mark Staniforth

Associate Professor Mark Staniforth is currently Acting Head of the Department of Archaeology and the Convenor of the Maritime Archaeology Program (MAP) at Flinders University where he teaches topics in undergraduate and postgraduate maritime archaeology. Mark has broad experience in historical archaeology, maritime archaeology and museums and he has published more than 70 publications in a twenty-five year career in maritime archaeology. He is currently the holder of Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage Grant for the Port Adelaide project and was recently awarded an International Science Linkages – Humanities and Creative Arts Programme International Research Fellowship to conduct collaborative research in Vietnam. In 2003, Mark was awarded a Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching and in 2008 an Australian Teaching and Learning Council (ALTC) National Citation for Excellence in Teaching. He is also an Associate Member of the Flinders College of Distinguished Educators. Mark was recently appointed as a member of the South Australian Heritage Council (SAHC) for a three year term (2009-2011) and is Chair of the SAHC’s Maritime Heritage Working Group.

As a professional member of both the Australian Association of Consulting Archaeologists (AACA Inc) and ICOMOS, Mark has conducted archaeological survey and excavation in all Australian states as well as overseas, both underwater and on land across a wide range of archaeological sites.

Field School Staff

Helen Carter (not pictured)

Louise Holt
Louise Holt

Louise is currently a part-time Master's student in Cultural Heritage Management while working as one of the department's technical officers. She developed her interests in Built Heritage while living and working in England and France. Louise returned to Australia in 2007 with Skippy, her French cat.

Emily Jateff
Emily Jateff

Emily Jateff holds an undergraduate degree in anthropology with a focus in maritime archaeology from the University of West Florida and a Master in Maritime Archaeology from Flinders University. Over the last seven years, she has participated in numerous underwater and intertidal archaeological projects throughout the Southeastern US, Canada and Australia. Her masters thesis detailed the search for evidence of a late 19th-early 20th century shore-based whaling station at Diamond City, North Carolina. She is a member of SAFE/Saving Antiquities for Everyone, serving on the Board of Governors for 2007-2008, a member of the AIC-Collections Emergency Response Team, and the recipient of the James Beard Foundation Scholarship for gastronomic studies. Ms. Jateff is currently employed as an Associate Lecturer in maritime archaeology with the Flinders University Archaeology Department. Emily's current research interests include a survey of public perspectives on the illicit recovery and sale of underwater cultural heritage (with the South Carolina Sport Diver Management Program) and the Australian shipbuilding project.

John Naumann
John Naumann

The Maritime Archaeology programme’s technical officer, Mr. John Naumann has been with Flinders University for just over 12 months. Previously John has been a secondary teacher at country and city high schools teaching technology studies, computing and science. Always a keen wreck diver, and SCUBA instructor, he re-trained at Adelaide University completing a B. Sc (Hons.) in marine biology and ecology. His research centred on a key herbivore of temperate rocky reefs the common purple sea urchin (Heliocidaris erythrogramma). At university he became one of a small team of active scientific divers who frequently assisted each other by diving both locally and around the state. As an added part of his research, he dived among Sepia apama, the giant Australian Cuttlefish aggregation at Point Lowley, near Whyalla, which was spectacular. Having had a long association with diving around South Australia, John has developed a particular interest in its wrecks. As a recreational diver he has seen a range of wrecks when diving; predominantly 19th and 20th century iron wrecks. As part of the team at Flinders, he has assisted in research into indigenous craft now stored at the SA Museum’s facility at Netley, boat sheds on the rocky foreshore at Second Valley, contemporary wrecks in the Port River, historic ships’ anchors near the reef at Port Noarlunga and the Ships’ Graveyard in the North Arm.

Team Supervisors.

James Hunter
James Hunter

James commenced his postgraduate studies as a Ph.D. student in maritime archaeology at Flinders University in May 2008 and is conducting his research with the assistance of an Australian government Endeavour International Postgraduate Research Scholarship. He is a former member of the archaeological team investigating the American Civil War submarine H.L. Hunley, as well as a former staff archaeologist with the U.S. Naval Historical Center's Underwater Archaeology Branch. He received his M.A. in History/Historical Archaeology from the University of West Florida in Pensacola in 2001. He has participated in the survey and excavation of a variety of shipwrecks and submerged archaeological sites from the sixteenth, eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries. James’ doctoral research addresses torpedo boats, a largely overlooked element of the colonial naval forces that served Australia and New Zealand prior to Federation in 1901. These craft were a component of a larger military response within Australasia to fears of perceived Russian—and later French and German—expansionist designs on British territories in the South Pacific following the end of the Crimean War. His thesis, entitled “Throwaway Navies: Colonial Australasian Torpedo Boat Squadrons and the Archaeology of Frontier Defence and Discard,” seeks to identify cultural factors that influenced the deployment and subsequent discard of boats and other military materiel associated with torpedo boat squadrons in colonial Australasia. Material evidence collected as a result of this research will demonstrate that deployment and subsequent disposal of vessels and structures associated with colonial torpedo boat defences were indicative of “frontier-style” adaptations by military planners and government officials charged with creating quasi-independent naval forces with limited funding, resources, and support. He expects to complete his candidacy in May 2011.

Debbie Shefi
Debbie Shefi

Debbie returned to Flinders University to begin her Ph.D. candidature in 2009. She received her Bachelors Degree in the History of Art from the University of California, Berkeley in 2003 and her Masters in Maritime Archaeology from Flinders University in 2006. After completing her Masters, she worked for the Florida Department of State, Bureau of Archaeological Research as a Senior Archaeologists on the Underwater Team.

Debbie’s doctoral research seeks to investigate whether or not it is possible to accelerate the development of, and then maintain, an anaerobic environment on a shipwreck site by changing the sediment particle size at the initial reburial phase. The experimental research will begin in April 2010 and continue for two years. She aims to complete her candidacy in Dec 2012.

Department for Environment and Heritage

Shane Holland (not pictured)

Amer Khan
Amer Khan

Amer graduated from Yale University with a double major in Biology (BA) and Computer Science (BSc) in 1996. After working in Silicon Valley for a number of years he came to Flinders University to complete his Masters in Maritime Archaeology in 2006. Amer is now working as a maritime heritage officer with the Department for Environment and Heritage (DEH) in Adelaide. His primary role is to manage the historic shipwreck resource in SA and to administer State and Commonwealth legislation for the projection of historic shipwrecks. His work includes a combination of project management, research, report writing and fieldwork.

Amer was involved with a number of different projects after completing his Masters degree. After graduating from Flinders he worked as a contract field archaeologist in Western Australia, identifying and recording indigenous coastal occupation sites. He subsequently served as heritage officer with Aboriginal Heritage Branch in Adelaide to develop and deliver a community engagement and archaeological training program. Amer was also contracted by UNESCO to help develop a regional training program in maritime archaeology. Prior to starting at DEH, he worked with the Department of Archaeology at Flinders to help coordinate a regional fellowship program funded by AusAID. Amer continues to maintain a close working relationship with staff, researchers and students in the Maritime Archaeology Program.

David Nutley
David Nutley

David Nutley is a Team Leader of the Cultural Heritage Policy and Assessments Team in the Heritage Branch of the South Australian Department for Environment and Heritage. He manages a dedicated team of specialists involved in processing nominations for heritage listing and the management of the State’s underwater cultural heritage. His key responsibilities lie in the area of policy development and strategic planning.

David came to South Australia as Principal Maritime Heritage Officer in 2008 after spent 20 years managing underwater cultural heritage in New South Wales Heritage Office in Sydney, New South Wales – a program he established in 1988. He has over 23 years experience in maritime heritage management, including curatorial (Australian National Maritime Museum, Sydney), extensive field survey, significance assessment, archaeological report writing, policy development, strategic planning and public education experience.

David has been a regular contributor to publications and magazine articles for ICUCH, UNESCO and other organisations. He is the co-editor of the ICUCH/UNESCO publication Underwater Cultural Heritage at Risk. He was President of the Australasian Institute for Maritime Archaeology (AIMA) from 1997-2002, Senior Vice-President from 2003-2005, Vice-President from 2006-2009 and is also a past Senior Tutor for the AIMA/NAS training courses. He has served on several national and international heritage forums including UNESCO workshops in Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Hong Kong, Egypt and Tanzania.


Graduate Students

Samantha Bell
Samantha Bell

Sam graduated from California State University East Bay majoring in History with some courses in Anthropology and Archaeology. Her interest in archaeology stems from experience gained from a survey she worked on in Idaho, USA. While Sam has very little experience in archaeology, she has a love for maritime archaeology with particular interest in public interpretation of maritime culture, heritage trails, underwater World War II aviation wrecks, and the material culture of riverboats.

Britt Burton
Britt Burton

Britt Burton received her undergraduate degree in Archaeology from Flinders University in Adelaide, South Australia in 2008. She is currently undertaking her Masters in Maritime Archaeology with a thesis due for completion at the end of 2010. Her thesis topic is investigating the construction of a unique late 19th century wooden dry-floating dock in the small town of Mannum in South Australia. Besides maritme, her other interests lie with historical and classical archaeology.

Matt Hanks
Matt Hanks

Matt graduated from Baylor University in Waco, Texas with a BA double majoring in Archaeology and Anthropology. His field experience includes excavating, artifact analysis, and data entry at numerous sites in Central Texas. Although his studies and experience are in the field of terrestrial archaeology, his professional interests lie in maritime archaeology and include historic trade routes, ship artillery, as well as the management and preservation of underwater cultural heritage.

Denise Kuijlaars
Denise Kuijlaars

Denise is an archaeologist from the Netherlands. Unfortunately, maritime archaeology is not offered as a complete course in the Netherlands, so when she finished her Masters in Archaeology, she decided to go overseas and study at Flinders University. Her interests are Mediterranean archaeology and the social aspect of ships and seafaring.

Sarah Nahabedian
Sarah Nahabedian

Sarah has a BS in Marine Biology and a BA in Spanish from Roger William University. She is interested in Spanish colonial shipwrecks and combining maritime biology and maritime archaeology.

Jeff Pardee
Jeff Pardee

Jeffrey Pardee, or Jefe, has always loved the ocean and history. Therefore, it was no surprise that his interests lead him to maritime archaeology. Jeff’s undergraduate degree was in maritime archaeology, focusing more on ship construction than anything else. Upon reaching Flinders, he realized that his view of maritime archaeology was very narrow and he has thus spent the duration of his masters in Australia, attempting towiden his understanding of the field. At present, Jeff will complete his Masters from Flinders University in December 2010.

Undergraduate Students

Maddy Fowler
Maddy Fowler

Maddy is originally from Queensland. She is in her third year of a Bachelors of Archaeology with the aim of continuing studying to become a maritime archaeologist. She is an active member of a dive club and loves diving whenever possible.

Maddy McAllister
Maddy McAllister

At the start of the Maritime Archaeology Field School in Streaky Bay, Maddy was at the start of her third year as an undergraduate student doing a Bachelor of Archaeology. The Maritime Field School, although hard work and long hours, was some of the best experience in the field that she has had. Maddy is originally from Western Australia but moved to Adelaide in 2008 to undertake her studies at Flinders University. Her interests are mainly maritime and underwater archaeology, and she hopes to start a Masters of Maritime Archaeology in 2011.

Return to the Flinders 2010 February Field School Poster