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Italian Program

To major in Italian:

10 courses (30 credits) beyond the Introductory level of the language,* including at least two 400-level courses. Students may use up to three credits from ITL 391, 392, or 395 toward the major.

This typically means 10 from among the following courses:

  • Intermediate Italian (103, 104)
  • Conversation and Composition (205, 206)
  • Advanced Conversation and Composition (305)
  • Introduction to Italian Civilization (301, 302)
  • Introduction to Italian Literature (325, 326)
  • Studies in Italian Cinema (315)
  • Italian Literature in Translation (390) (authors change)
  • Betrayal and Redemption: Novels and Memoirs of Antonia Arslan, Primo Levi, Niccolò -Ammaniti (example of course taught)
  • Dante’s Divine Comedy (395) (in translation)
  • Selected Italian Authors (455) (authors change; course can be taken up to 3 times)
  • Giovanni Boccaccio’s Decameron (example of course taught)
  • Topics in Italian Literature (465) (topic changes; course can be taken up to 3 times)
  • Women Shaping Culture: Renaissance to the Enlightenment
  • Writers of the ‘900: Vittorini, Pavese, and Calvino
  • Business Italian (480)
  • Works of Dante Alighieri (481)
  • Directed Study (497-498)
    • Examples of recent Directed Studies:
      Il cinema italiano e il neorealismo
      Il Decameron di Boccaccio
      Una storia d’amore: “La nascita di Venere” di Sandro Botticelli
      Letteratura ed emigrazione
      Primo Levi e Se questo è un uomo

* i.e., beyond the ITL101 (Beginning Italian I), ITL 102 (Beginning Italian II) or ITL 111 (Accelerated Beginning Italian I & II) levels. You also need to satisfy the General Education requirements for a B.A. degree.

To minor in Italian:

6 courses (18 credits) beyond the Introductory level of the language.* Students may use up to three credits from ITL 391, 392, or 395 toward the minor.

This typically means 6 from among the following courses:

  • Intermediate Italian (103, 104)
  • Conversation and Composition (205, 206)
  • Advanced Conversation and Composition (305)
  • Introduction to Italian Civilization (301, 302)
  • Studies in Italian Cinema (315)
  • Introduction to Italian Literature (325, 326)
  • Italian Literature in Translation (390)
  • Betrayal and Redemption: Novels and Memoirs of Antonia Arslan, Primo Levi, Niccolò
  • Ammaniti (example of course taught)
  • Dante’s Divine Comedy (395) (in translation)
  • Selected Italian Authors (455) (authors change; course can be taken up to 3 times
  • Giovanni Boccaccio’s Decameron (example of course taught)
  • Topics in Italian Literature (465) (topic changes, course can be taken up to 3 times
  • Women Shaping Culture: Renaissance to the Enlightenment
  • Writers of the ‘900: Vittorini, Pavese, and Calvino
  • Business Italian (480)
  • Works of Dante Alighieri (481)

* i.e., beyond the ITL101 (Beginning Italian I), ITL 102 (Beginning Italian II) or ITL 111 (Accelerated Beginning Italian I & II) levels.

Outcome Statements for Italian Majors

Students will demonstrate advanced skills in the four language modalities of speaking, reading, writing and listening. They will demonstrate critical thinking and collaborative problem-solving abilities through advanced task-based language activities. 1. SPEAKING
  1. Students will be able to satisfy the requirements of everyday situations and routine school and work requirements.
  2. Students can handle with confidence, though not always with facility, complicated tasks and social situations, e. g., elaborating, complaining and apologizing.
  3. Students can narrate and describe in past, present and future time, linking sentences smoothly.
  4. Students can use communication strategies, e. g., circumlocution, paraphrasing, pauses and fillers, to smooth over vocabulary shortcomings.
  5. Students show signs of an emerging ability to support opinions, explain in detail and hypothesize.
  6. Students can be understood without difficulty by native interlocutors.
2. LISTENING
  1. Students are able to almost fully understand most speech on a familiar topic, e. g, a classroom lecture on an assigned topic; the narration of an event; a video on a familiar subject.
  2. Students show an emerging ability to understand the gist of a propositionally and linguistically complex discourse, e. g., a televised political debate, or a classroom lecture on a literary or cultural topic.
3. READING
  1. Students are able to read and demonstrate good comprehension of written discourse in areas of the students' special interest (e. g., a literary text, a magazine or newspaper article, a technical document).
  2. Students are able to understand parts of texts which are conceptually abstract and linguistically complex and/or texts which treat unfamiliar topics.
  3. Students show an emerging awareness of the aesthetic properties of language and of literary styles.
  4. Students are able to recognize the role of cultural knowledge in comprehension of the written text.
4. WRITING
  1. Students can write about a variety of topics with significant precision and in detail.
  2. Students can narrate and describe in past, present and future time.
  3. Students are able to state their opinions and provide some support for their points of view in written discourse.
  4. Student will demonstrate ability to do basic analysis and research on a literary or cultural topic and present their findings in a research paper.
5. CULTURES AND LITERATURES
  1. Students will demonstrate a knowledge of Italian literature and culture (e.g., through analysis of a major literary period, author, historical personage, or events, including contemporary events).
  2. Students will be aware of the extent and nature of the Italian civilization and populations.
  3. Students will be able to compare and contrast cultural practices as they relate to Italian and American culture and, based on that knowledge, be able to generalize about the importance of understanding cultural differences.
6. CRITICAL THINKING* AND COLLABORATION

Students will demonstrate critical thinking and collaborative problem-solving abilities through advanced task-based language activities.

Sample benchmark tasks may include: student-created skits, videos, websites, curriculum vitae, summaries, research reports, internship reports, student-led classes, or oral presentations.

* [critical thinking: ability to clarify or critique texts, generalize without oversimplifying, distinguish fact from opinion, compare and contrast, clarify issues, make interdisciplinary connections, compare perspectives, exercise fair mindedness, think independently.]

Curriculum Map for Italian Majors

Italian OHE Program Assessment Form (2009-2010)

Italian OHE Program Assessment Form (2007-2008)

For more information, please contact Dr. Catherine Sama or Dr. Michelangelo La Luna .