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2009-2010 Catalog Online

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College of Engineering

INDEX

Curriculum Requirements

Biomedical Engineering

Chemical Engineering

Civil Engineering

Computer Engineering

Electrical Engineering

Industrial and Systems Engineering

Mechanical Engineering

Ocean Engineering

Raymond M. Wright, Dean

George E. Veyera, Interim Associate Dean

URI Engineering’s Mission. The College of Engineering (COE) is a diverse community of scholars, learners, and professional staff dedicated to the development and application of advanced technologies, and working together to enhance the quality of life for all. We are creative problem solvers, innovators, inventors, and entrepreneurs, applying our skills for the advancement of knowledge, service to our community, and the economic development of the state of Rhode Island and beyond. We prepare our graduates to be global leaders in a wide range of engineering disciplines and to create new knowledge, products, and services.

Expected Learning Outcomes. As required by the criteria of ABET, Inc., the national Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology, graduates receiving baccalaureate degrees in all engineering disciplines will demonstrate:

(a) an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering

(b) an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data

(c) an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability

(d) an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams

(e) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems

(f) an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility

(g) an ability to communicate effectively

(h) the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context

(i) a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in, life-long learning

(j) a knowledge of contemporary issues

(k) an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Engineers from all fields are heavily involved in the solution of technological and socio-technological problems; industry’s needs are for balanced teams of both men and women from different engineering areas. Therefore, the college’s goal is to stimulate our students to become creative, responsible engineers, aware of the social implications of their work, and flexible enough to adjust to the rapid changes taking place in the world and, consequently, in all branches of engineering.

The College of Engineering (COE) offers undergraduate majors in biomedical, chemical, chemical and ocean, civil, computer, electrical, industrial, mechanical, and ocean engineering. In addition, an ocean option is available in mechanical engineering. Because the same fundamental concepts underlie all branches of engineering, the freshman-year courses are quite similar for all curricula, and the choice of a specific branch of engineering may be delayed until the beginning of either the second term or the second year of study. Students electing one of the programs that include ocean options follow the curriculum for chemical or mechanical engineering for two or three years and enroll in several ocean engineering courses in the junior and senior years. All of the engineering curricula are based on an intense study of mathematics and the basic sciences supporting the fundamentals of each engineering discipline. These principles are applied to the understanding and solution of problems of current interest and importance in the field. Each curriculum is designed to provide the knowledge and ability necessary for practice as a professional engineer, or for successful graduate study, which may include law, business administration, or medicine, as well as engineering and science disciplines.

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Curriculum Requirements

Entering engineering students who have chosen a specific major should follow the particular program listed in this section. It is recommended that those students who have decided to major in engineering but have not selected a specific program take the following courses: CHM 101 and 102, EGR 105, MTH 141, PHY 203 and 273, and a general education requirement during their first semester. Students who are still undecided about their choice of major after completing the first semester should review their choice of courses for the second semester with their advisor to be certain that they meet the prerequisites for the sophomore year.

Students who are undecided about engineering but wish to keep it open as an option should note that MTH 141, 142; PHY 203, 204 and 273, 274; and a course in chemistry are required for graduation from the College of Engineering, and are prerequisites for many engineering courses. They must be taken before transferring from University College (UC) to the COE.

To transfer from UC to the COE, students must not only complete at least 24 credits (including transfer credits) with a grade point average of 2.00 or better, they must also have completed 20 credits from the following list of required courses with a grade point average of 2.00 or better: MTH 141, 142; CHM 101/102; PHY 203/273; EGR 105, 106; and either PHY 204/274 or CHM 112/114.

To meet graduation requirements, students enrolled in the COE must satisfactorily complete all courses of the curriculum in which they are registered and obtain a grade point average of 2.00 or better in all required science, mathematics, and engineering courses (including professional electives). Students are also required to complete an exit survey at least one semester prior to their anticipated graduation date. At the discretion of the dean, students who do not demonstrate satisfactory progress may be required to leave the COE.

Student Advisement. Engineering students are advised by engineering faculty members. While the student is in University College (UC), the advising takes place at UC; once the student transfers to the COE, advising takes place at the departmental level. The office of the Associate Dean of Engineering provides non-routine advising.

General Education Requirements. Engineering students must meet URI’s general education requirements listed on pages 33-35, except that only three credits are required in the foreign language or culture component. In these courses, students are exposed to and challenged by concepts from the humanities and social sciences to ensure that the social relevance of their engineering activities will never be forgotten. In selecting courses to satisfy these requirements, students should consult with their advisors to be certain that they have met department-specific course requirements. The requirements in mathematics and natural sciences are satisfied by required courses in the engineering curricula.

Computers. The Engineering Computer Center (ECC), located in the Chester H. Kirk Center for Advanced Technology, supports the teaching and research activities of the College of Engineering. The ECC has a quad processor Dell PowerEdge server providing centralized services for PC file and print sharing, license serving, email, and Web applications. Both wireless and cabled network access are available. Students are assigned computer accounts upon entering the COE and use these accounts until they graduate. Email accounts are also provided. These are maintained separately and do not expire.

There are 85 networked PCs available at the ECC for student use. These are incorporated into two classrooms with projection systems, a main student work area, and two side project/study rooms. Also provided are two scanners, four laser printers, a color laser printer, and a large-scale pen plotter. Areas are available for students to set up their own laptops for access to software, printers, and the network. Available installed software includes Abaqus, Adobe Acrobat, Adobe PhotoShop, Aspen, AutoCAD, EES, LabView, Maple, MatLab, Microsoft Office, Microsoft Visual Studio, Minitab, Multisim, SolidWorks, and Working Model.

In addition to providing the computer technologies that engineering students rely on for their course work, the ECC provides faculty members with the resources necessary for their teaching and research commitments, through the use of network services, interactive multimedia classrooms, and the expertise of the ECC staff in identifying and procuring hardware and software.

A new 30-seat classroom, called the Discovery Center, was added to the ECC in 2008. This state-of-the-art multimedia computer classroom has dual-monitor PCs for the students; an instructor podium with tablet monitors and the ability to interact with any of the student PCs; eight wide-screen, flat-panel TV monitors; and two large screen projectors. This room is heavily used for our introductory freshman engineering classes, where students are introduced to the College of Engineering, engineering career paths, engineering problem solving, teamwork, hands-on projects, and software with applications that they will use in other engineering classes during their time at URI. The Discovery Center is also used by other engineering classes and is available to all engineering students for general use during the evenings and in between classes.

The Department of Chemical Engineering has a senior computing room with PCs and a junior computing room, also with PCs. Several specialized software packages such as Aspen and FEMLAB are available on these computers for undergraduate teaching and research. Printers are located in all the computer rooms, and a dedicated large-scale plotter is available in the department.

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering has two computational facilities. The CADD Laboratory contains 22 state-of-the-art computers, two large-format plotters, and several printers; it is also equipped with a direct projection multimedia system. In addition to AutoCAD, other software packages are available in this laboratory including AutoCOGO, CIVIL, CONSOL, Darwin, Eaglepoint, HCS, Land Development Desktop, MicroPaver, RSS, PCSTABL, RamSteel, Seep/W, Sewer-CAD, Slope/W, SRWALL, STAADPro, SURVEY, Synchro, TransCAD, TSIS, WaterCAD, ZStress, and others. Modern geomatics and surveying equipment (funded by the Champlin Foundations) including electronic Total Station and GPS for field data acquisition are linked to the CADD lab computers, printers, and plotters for graphic GIS representation and analysis. The senior Capstone Design Project Studio has six computers used by the design teams during the integrated capstone design project.

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering has numerous multiprocessor Linux and UNIX servers. The primary servers feature hardware raid and fiber-optic gigabit network connections. The main computing lab hosts 14 general use, dual-monitor Linux work stations, many of which have dual-core processors. These machines are available 24 hours a day to all students in the department. In addition, there are approximately 50 Linux workstations and 40 Windows systems dispersed throughout laboratories and offices. Available software includes Matlab for signal processing, HSPICE for analog circuit simulation, Quartus for FPGA simulation and design, as well as thousands of open-source applications. Numerous laser printers are available, including duplex (two-sided) and color variants. Wireless network access is available throughout the department.

The Department of Mechanical Engineering has a computer classroom that includes 25 networked PC workstations, two high-speed laser printers, and a direct projection system for classroom and seminar presentations. Application software includes SolidWorks, Working Model, Matlab, Abaqus, Algor, Excel, FEMLAB, Maple, Engineering Equation Solver, Compact 2-D (CFD) and others. In addition, laboratories in the Mechanical Engineering Department are equipped with a variety of computers for computational modeling studies, high-speed data acquisition, and control of mechanical devices.

The Department of Ocean Engineering has a computer laboratory at the Narragansett Bay Campus to support both their education and research programs. The laboratory is permanently accessible to students, both physically (in two computer rooms located in the Middleton Building, with electronic code access) and remotely through the Internet. The laboratory is equipped with nine Pentium IV and five dual-core PC workstations, two laser printers, and an 8-processor Microways Opteron computer cluster running UNIX. Each PC features, as a minimum, MatLab, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, LaTeX, Scientific Word, Netscape/Explorer, AUTOCAD, LabView, SolidWorks, and email software. The cluster has an MPI parallel FORTRAN compiler.

Minors and Double Majors. Students wanting to obtain strengths in other areas of academic specialization and yet remain in engineering are encouraged to do so by completing either a minor (please refer to page 35) or double major.

International Engineering Program (IEP). In conjunction with the College of Arts and Sciences, COE offers a five-year program in which students earn two degrees: a Bachelor of Science in engineering and a Bachelor of Arts in a foreign language. The foreign languages currently offered by the IEP are Chinese, German, French, and Spanish. In addition to their engineering and language-related courses, students spend six months abroad in a professional internship in Europe, Latin America, the Caribbean, or Asia. Upon graduation, students are well prepared to compete in the global marketplace. To enroll, an engineering student simply registers and follows the recommended outline of courses for the specific language. In 1992, the IEP was selected as the recipient of the Award for Educational Innovation by ABET, the national Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (currently known as ABET, Inc.).

Engineering and M.B.A. Program. This five-year program offers students the opportunity to earn a Bachelor of Science in engineering and a Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.). Students with a GPA of 3.00 or better may enroll during their senior year with successful completion of the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT).

Cooperative Education Program. Optional for juniors and seniors (with a GPA of at least 2.50) in all engineering departments, the Cooperative Education Program assists students with placements for part-time or full-time work directly related to a student’s field of study. Enrollment information may be obtained from the Dean’s Office, 102 Bliss Hall.

Accreditation. A national accrediting organization, ABET, Inc. (formerly known as Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, or ABET) established in 1933 and composed of representatives from technical societies, assures professional standards through periodic evaluations of the programs of the college. ABET, Inc. may be contacted at 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012 or by phone at 410.347.7700.

Continuous accreditation of URI’s engineering programs by ABET, Inc. has been in place since 1936 for the curricula of civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering, 1954 for chemical engineering, 1957 for industrial engineering, 1992 for computer engineering, 1995 for ocean engineering, and 1989 for the M.S. in manufacturing engineering.

URI’s College of Engineering is a member of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE).

Graduate Degrees. Graduate study is available in the College of Engineering at the Master of Science and Doctorate (Ph.D.) level. For a listing of advanced degrees, see the “Graduate Programs” section of this catalog.

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Biomedical Engineering

The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in biomedical engineering is offered by the Department of Electrical, Computer, and Biomedical Engineering. Specialization in biomedical engineering is also available within the Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) programs in electrical engineering.

Coordinator: Professor Ying Sun (Electrical, Computer, and Biomedical Engineering). Professors Boudreaux-Bartels, Jackson, Kumaresan, and Ohley; Associate Professor Vetter; Assistant Professors Besio and Huang; Adjunct Professor Chiaramida.

Program Educational Objectives. The biomedical engineering program at URI has four primary objectives:

1) Produce graduates who are able to practice biomedical engineering to serve hospitals, government agencies, national, state, regional, and international industries.

2) Produce graduates with the necessary background and technical skills to work professionally in one or more of the following areas: biomedical electronics, medical instrumentation, medical imaging, biomedical signal processing, rehabilitation engineering, and medical informatics.

3) Prepare graduates for personal and professional success with awareness and commitment to their ethical and social responsibilities, both as individuals and in team environments.

4) Prepare graduates who are capable of entering and succeeding in an advanced degree program in a field such as engineering, science, business, or medicine.

Program Description. Biomedical engineering is an interdisciplinary area in which engineering techniques are applied to problem solving in the life sciences and medicine. Biomedical engineers design medical instruments for diagnosis and the treatment of various diseases as well as for research in biology. Examples of instruments for diagnosis include electrocardiographs, electroencephalographs, automatic blood analyzers, and medical imaging systems such as X-ray imaging, radio-nuclide imaging, ultrasound imaging, computer-assisted tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Examples of instruments for treatment include radiotherapy machines, pacemakers, cardiac-assist devices, intelligent drug delivery systems, and lasers for surgery. Biomedical engineers develop artificial organs for prosthesis and various computer software and hardware systems to help provide high-quality, cost-effective health care.

Biomedical engineers are employed in the medical instrument industry, where they invent, design, manufacture, sell, and service medical equipment; hospitals, where they evaluate, select, maintain, and provide training for the use of complex medical equipment; and medical and biological research institutes, where they use unique analytical ability and instrumentation skills to conduct advanced research.

URI’s biomedical engineering program combines study in the biological sciences with the areas of engineering that are particularly important for the application of modern technology to medicine. This curriculum is designed to provide students with not only a general background in biomedical engineering but also a special focus on the skills in electrical engineering necessary for developing medical devices. With a few minor elective changes, the program also satisfies the entrance requirements of most medical schools, but students who plan to go on to medical school should consult the premedical advisor and the coordinator of the biomedical engineering program.

For transfer from University College to the College of Engineering in the biomedical engineering program, students must have completed all science, mathematics, and engineering courses required during the first two semesters with a grade point average of 2.00 or better.

Minimum Requirements

The major requires 128-129credits.

Humanities and Social Sciences (27 credits): see the general education requirements for the College of Engineering. Students should consult with their advisors regarding distribution of credits and approved courses (ECN 201 is included in 27-credit total).

Mathematics (at least 14 credits): MTH 141, 142, 243, 362, and technical elective.

Basic Sciences (26 credits): CHM 101, 102, 124; PHY 203, 273, 204, 274; BIO 121, 242, 244, 341.

Statistics (3 credits): STA 409.

Engineering Sciences and Design (55-56 credits): BME 181, 207, 281, 307, 360/361, 461, 462, 464/465, 468, 484, 485; EGR 105, 106; ELE 201/202, 212, 215, 313, 314, 338/339, 400; one technical elective (chosen from CHE 333, 347, 574; CSC 522; ELE 322, 343/344, 423, 435/436, 437, 438, 444/445, 447/448, 458/459, 501, 506; ISE 404, 412; MCE 341, 354, 372; MTH 363, 442, 444, 451, 461, 462, 464, 471, 472).

Free Elective: 3 credits.

Freshman YearFirst semester: 16 credits

CHM 101 (3), 102 (1); EGR 105 (1); MTH 141 (4); PHY 203 (3), 273 (1), and ECN 201 (3).

Second semester: 17 credits

BME 181 (1); CHM 124 (3); EGR 106 (2); MTH 142 (4); PHY 204 (3), 274 (1); and general education requirement (3).

Sophomore YearFirst semester: 18 credits

BIO 121 (4); BME 281 (1); ELE 201 (3), 202 (1); MTH 362 (3), and general education requirements (6).

Second semester: 15 credits

BIO 242 (3), 244 (1); BME 207 (3); ELE 212 (3), 215 (2); MTH 243 (3).

Junior YearFirst semester: 16 credits

BIO 341 (3); BME 307 (3); ELE 313 (3), 338 (3), 339 (1); and general education requirement (3).

Second semester: 16 credits

BME 360 (1), 361 (1); ELE 314 (3); STA 409 (3); general education requirement (3); and free elective (3).

Senior YearFirst semester: 15-16 credits

BME 461 (3), 462 (3), 484 (2); ELE 400 (1); technical elective (3-4; see above); and general education requirement (3).

Second semester: 15 credits

BME 464 (3), 465 (1), 468 (3), 485 (2), and general education requirement (6).

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Chemical Engineering

The Department of Chemical Engineering offers a curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in chemical engineering that is accredited by ABET, Inc. In cooperation with the Department of Ocean Engineering, the department offers a curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in chemical and ocean engineering (not accredited). The department also offers the Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees.

Faculty: Professor Bose, chair. Professors S. Barnett, R. Brown, Gregory, Knickle, and Lucia; Associate Professors Gray, Greenfield, and Rivero-Hudec; Assistant Professor Bothun; Associate Research Professors Crisman and Park; Adjunct Assistant Professor Trottier; Professors Emeriti Rockett and Rose.

The chemical engineer is concerned with the application and control of processes leading to changes in chemical composition. These processes are most frequently associated with the production of useful products (chemicals, fuels, metals, foods, pharmaceuticals, paper, plastics, and the like), but also include processes such as removal of toxic components from the blood by an artificial kidney, environmental cleanup, and semiconductor processing. The chemical engineer’s domain includes more efficient production and use of energy, processing of wastes, and protection of the environment.

Chemical engineers have a strong foundation in chemistry, physics, mathematics, and basic engineering. Chemical engineering courses include thermodynamics, transport phenomena, mass transfer operations, materials engineering, process dynamics and control, kinetics, and plant design. The student has the opportunity to operate small-scale equipment and to visit local industry. Intensive work is undertaken in the solution of complex problems in which economics and optimization of engineering design are emphasized.

The Department of Chemical Engineering has introduced a new biology track into its curriculum. The primary motivation is to respond to advances in our understanding of biological processes at the molecular and macroscopic levels, and the unique opportunity for chemical engineers to translate that understanding to useful processes. The application of the chemical engineering paradigm to biology will enable graduates to develop new molecular biology tools; drug delivery systems; artificial skin, organs and tissues; sensors and alternative fuels; and to integrate new bio-products into existing materials. The new curriculum is founded on the core principles of transport phenomena, unit operations, thermodynamics, and reaction kinetics. Students opting for this track will take a series of five courses in the Biochemistry and Cell and Molecular Biology departments. Besides preparing students for the biotechnology industry, this combination of biology, chemical engineering, and chemistry courses is relevant to those considering medical school.

Department Mission Statement and Program Objectives. Consistent with missions of the University and the College of Engineering, URI’s Department of Chemical Engineering seeks to prepare students to practice professionally in the fields of chemical engineering through the provision of high quality undergraduate and graduate educational programs, to provide an environment for satisfying faculty career development, and to maintain a world-renowned scholarly research program.

Program Educational Objectives. The chemical engineering program at URI has four primary objectives:

1) Produce graduates who are able to successfully practice chemical engineering to serve state, local, national, and international industries, and government agencies.

2) Produce graduates with the necessary background and technical skills to work professionally as individuals or in teams in chemical engineering practice or in graduate schools.

3) Prepare graduates for personal and professional success with an understanding and appreciation of ethical behavior, social responsibility, and diversity, both as individuals and in team environments.

4) Prepare graduates to be interested, motivated, and capable of pursuing continued lifelong learning through further graduate education, short courses, or other training programs in engineering or related fields.

URI’s chemical engineering program is more than just a collection of courses and credit hours whose content reflects the required criteria. The program has also been carefully designed to prepare students for the profession of chemical engineering through study, experience, and practice. Through eight specific program goals, the Department of Chemical Engineering at URI seeks to:

1) provide the necessary background in science, particularly chemistry, physics, and advanced mathematics through the study of differential equations, so that students will be able to continue their education in the engineering sciences, with depth of understanding, and learn to apply these subjects to the formulation and solution of engineering problems;

2) provide a broad cross section of fundamental engineering science courses, including some from other engineering disciplines so that our students will acquire an understanding of the way in which chemistry, physics, and mathematics have been and continue to be used to solve important engineering problems relevant to the general chemical engineering and engineering design;

3) provide students with experience in conducting and planning experiments in the modern engineering laboratory, including interfacing experiments with computers as well as interpreting the significance of resulting data and properly reporting results in well-written technical reports;

4) provide experience in the process of original chemical engineering design in the areas of equipment design, process design, and plant design through the process of formulating a design solution to a perceived need and then executing the design and evaluating its performance, including economic considerations and societal impacts if any, along with other related constraints, culminating in both written and oral presentations of results;

5) provide experience with the multifaceted aspects of using computers to solve problems and present results with word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, and professional-level applications software used for design and analysis; and provide for obtaining and using information on the World Wide Web;

6) provide a familiarity with professional issues in chemical engineering, including ethics, issues related to the global economy and to emerging technologies, and fostering of important job-related skills such as improved oral and written communications and experience in working in teams at a number of levels;

7) encourage students to become actively engaged in the student chapter of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and other student organizations, and to continue these associations after graduation with an emphasis on the importance of lifelong professional development including the desirability of attending graduate school or otherwise obtaining continuing or advanced education; and

8) make available continuous individual advising throughout the entire undergraduate educational experience to insure that each student makes the most of the educational opportunities provided by URI, particularly those related to general education electives that might enhance an engineering education, and special programs such as internships, cooperative experience and especially the International Engineering Programs in Chinese, German, French, and Spanish which are a unique opportunity available to globally motivated URI engineering students.

The major requires 129-130 credits.

Freshman YearFirst semester: 16 credits

CHM 101 (3), 102 (1), EGR 105 (1), MTH 141 (4), PHY 203 (3), PHY 273 (1), and general education requirement (3).

Second semester: 17 credits

CHM 112 (3), 114 (1), EGR 106 (2), MTH 142 (4), PHY 204 (3), 274 (1), and ECN 201 (3).

Sophomore YearFirst semester: 15-16 credits

CHE 212 (3), CHM 291 (4) or CHM 227 (3), MTH 243 (3), and general education requirements (6).

Second semester: 15-16 credits

CHE 272 (3), 313 (3), 332 (3); CHM 228 or BCH 311, or an approved advanced chemistry course (3), and MTH 244 or 362 (3).

Junior YearFirst semester: 17 credits

CHE 314 (3), 347 (3), CHM 431 (3), 335 (2), approved mathematics elective (3), and general education requirement (3).

Second semester: 15 credits

CHE 348 (3), 464 (3), CHM 432 or approved department elective that meets accreditation requirements (3), and general education requirements (6).

Senior YearFirst semester: 17 credits

CHE 328 (1), 345 [capstone] (2), 349 (2), 351 [capstone] (3), 425 (3), and approved professional elective (3), and general education requirement (3).

Second semester: 17 credits

CHE 346 [capstone] (2), 352 [capstone] (3), approved professional electives (9), and general education requirement (3).

Chemical and Ocean Engineering. As of June 2009, new admissions to this program have been suspended. Students enrolled in this curriculum follow the program of study for chemical engineering during their freshman, sophomore, and junior years, with OCG 451 as the junior year department elective. The senior year curriculum follows.

The major requires 134-136 credits.

Senior YearFirst semester: 18 credits

CHE 328 (1), 349 (2), 351 [capstone] (3), 403 [capstone] (3), 425 (3), and approved professional elective (6).

Second semester: 19 credits

CHE 352 [capstone] (3), 404 [capstone] (3), 534 (3), OCE 311 (4), and general education requirements (6).

Biology Track in Chemical Engineering. Students enrolled in this curriculum will follow a program similar to the traditional chemical engineering curriculum, but with biology and biochemistry courses replacing some of the other technical and science courses. Total credits: 133.

Freshman YearFirst semester: 16 credits

CHM 101 (3), 102 (1); EGR 105 (1); MTH 141 (4); PHY 203 (3), 273 (1), and general education requirement (3).

Second semester: 17 credits

BIO 101 (4); CHM 112 (3), 114 (1); EGR 106 (2); MTH 142 (4); and ECN 201 (3) or general education requirement.

Sophomore YearFirst semester: 18 credits

CHE 212 (3), 227 (3); MTH 243 (3), and general education requirements (9).

Second semester: 15 credits

BCH 311 (3); CHE 272 (3), 313 (3), 332 (3); and MTH 244 (3) or 362 (3).

Junior YearFirst semester: 16 credits

BIO 341 (3); CHE 314 (3), 347 (3); PHY 204 (3), 274 (1), and general education requirement (3).

Second semester: 17 credits

CHE 348 (3), 464 (3); MIC 211 (4), BIO 352 (4), and general education requirements (3).

Senior YearFirst semester: 17 credits

CHE 328 (1), 345 [capstone] (2), 349 (2), 351 [capstone] (3), 425 (3), approved professional elective (3), and general education requirement (3).

Second semester: 17 credits

CHE 346 [capstone] (2), 352 [capstone] (3); BIO 437 (3), an approved professional elective (3), approved math elective (3), and general education requirements (3).

Pharmaceutical Track in Chemical Engineering. Biopharmaceuticals is one of the fastest growing industrial sectors both in the United States and worldwide, with a projected growth rate of ten percent per year for the foreseeable future. Driving this rapid growth are the worldwide increase in average life span, major developments in our understanding of key factors behind the development of disease, and important innovations in drug formulations and delivery. This growth has created a need for graduates who are well-versed in the basic sciences as well as all technological aspects related to the development process for therapeutic agents—production, scale-up and processing, formulation and delivery, and regulatory constraints. The pharmaceutical engineering B.S. degree program within chemical engineering serves to meet this need. It combines the well-known strengths of the College of Pharmacy with those of the Department of Chemical Engineering, for a curriculum that will produce leaders in the pharmaceutical industry.

Students follow a curriculum similar to that for traditional chemical engineering, but with biology, biochemistry, and biomedical-and-pharmaceutical-science courses replacing some of the other technical and science courses. The major requires 135 credits.

Freshman YearFirst Semester: 16 credits

CHM 101 (3) and 102 (1); EGR 105 (1); MTH 141 (4); PHY 203 (3) and 273 (1), and general education requirements (3).

Second Semester: 17 credits

BIO 101 (4); CHM 112 (3) and 114 (1); EGR 106 (2); MTH 142 (4), and ECN 201 (3) or general education requirements (3).

Sophomore YearFirst Semester: 18 credits

CHE 212 (3); CHM 227 (3); MTH 243 (3), and general education requirements (9).

Second Semester: 15 credits

BCH 311 (3); CHE 272 (3), 313 (3), and 332 (3); MTH 244 (3) or 362 (3).

Junior YearFirst Semester: 18 credits

BIO 341 (3); BPS 301 (2), 303 (2), and 305 (2); CHE 314 (3) and 347 (3); and general education requirements (3).

Junior YearSecond Semester: 17 credits

CHE 348 (3) and 464 (3); MIC 211 (4); PHY 204 (3) and 274 (1); and general education requirements (3).

Senior YearFirst Semester: 17 credits

BPS 425 (3); CHE 328 (1), 345 (2), 349 (2), 351 (3), 425 (3), and 574 (3).

Senior YearSecond Semester: 17 credits

CHE 346 (2), 352 (3), and 548 (3) or approved professional elective (3); approved professional elective (3); and general education requirements (6).

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Civil Engineering

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers a curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in civil engineering. The department also offers the Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in civil and environmental engineering. The Bachelor of Science program in civil engineering is accredited by ABET, Inc.

Faculty: Professor Tsiatas, chairperson. Professors Lee, Veyera, and R. Wright; Associate Professors Baxter, Gindy, Hunter, Karamanlidis, Thiem, and Thomas; Assistant Professor Craver; Adjunct Professors Baird, Harr, and T. Wright; Adjunct Associate Professors Apostal and O’Neill; Adjunct Assistant Professors Badorek, George, and Osborn; Professors Emeriti Kovacs, Marcus, McEwen, Poon, and Urish.

Department Mission Statement. Consistent with the missions of the University of Rhode Island and the College of Engineering, the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering seeks to prepare students to practice professionally in the national and international marketplace in the field of Civil and Environmental Engineering through the provision of high quality undergraduate and graduate educational programs and research opportunities; provide an environment that encourages and supports faculty career development and professional/community service; actively promote diversity; and maintain a nationally recognized research program.

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering (BSCE) Program Mission Statement. Consistent with the mission of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, the BSCE Program will prepare graduates for successful careers, advanced studies at the graduate level, and lifelong learning based upon a solid foundation of technical ability, high standards of professional ethics, and strong communication skills.

BSCE Program Educational Objectives. The BSCE program at URI has four primary objectives:

1) Produce graduates who are able to successfully practice civil engineering to serve local, state, regional, national and international industries, and government agencies.

2) Produce graduates with the necessary background and technical skills to work professionally in one or more of the following areas: environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, transportation engineering, water resources engineering.

3) Prepare graduates for personal and professional success with awareness of and commitment to their ethical and social responsibilities, and diversity, both as individuals and in team environments.

4) Prepare graduates to be interested in, motivated for, and capable of pursuing continued lifelong learning through further graduate education or other training programs in engineering or related fields.

BSCE Program Outcomes. URI’s BSCE program will prepare graduates for successful careers and advanced graduate studies based upon a solid foundation of technical ability, high standards of professional ethics, and strong communication skills. Program outcomes describe what the students are expected to know and have the ability to do by the time of graduation. The attainment of these outcomes indicates that the student is equipped to achieve the BSCE program educational objectives. The outcomes for the BSCE program are as follows:

1) An appropriate fundamental understanding of mathematics, physics, chemistry, geology, and other basic sciences.

2) Basic computer skills consistent with application to civil engineering problem-solving.

3) Basic engineering knowledge across a range of subjects including mechanics, mechanics of materials, engineering construction materials, statics, dynamics, fluid mechanics, and CADD.

4) An understanding of basic economics, together with approaches to economics-based decision-making.

5) A working knowledge of probability and statistics as applied to civil engineering problems.

6) Basic technical proficiency in at least four of the recognized civil engineering focus areas.

7) An understanding of the intra-disciplinary approach in civil engineering problem-solving and design at the design project level through an integrated capstone design project experience.

8) Experience with individual and team-based approaches to civil engineering problem solving in the classroom, laboratory, and through an integrated capstone design project experience.

9) Practical and hands-on laboratory experience solving civil engineering problems involving measuring physical phenomena and interpreting results.

10) An understanding of ethics of engineering activities, professional standards and responsibilities, the relationships between engineering and society in general, and the necessity for lifelong learning.

11) Well-developed written communication skills, and experience with oral communications, both individually and on teams.

12) A broad understanding and global perspective of society in general by exposure to fine arts, literature, letters, foreign language or culture, social science, and English communications.

13) An opportunity to obtain membership in and become active in the student chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers, develop teamwork and leadership skills, and participate in service activities related to the local community and the civil engineering professional society.

Civil engineers are responsible for researching, developing, planning, designing, constructing, and managing many of the complex systems and facilities essential to modern civilization. These include environmental engineering systems; water supply and pollution control systems; all types of transportation systems, from pipelines to city streets; structural systems from residential buildings to city skyscrapers, power plants, and offshore platforms; and all types of geotechnical systems from foundations to dams. Civil engineers play important roles in planning and administration with government agencies at all levels, especially those dealing with public works, transportation, environmental control, water supply, and energy.

The curriculum provides students with an excellent background to pursue graduate study or to enter directly into professional practice in industry or government after graduation. The first year is devoted largely to courses in mathematics, chemistry, physics, and engineering science common to all engineering curriculums. During the sophomore year, students take three courses in civil engineering including mechanics of materials and two laboratories. In their last two years, students develop a proficiency in environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, and transportation engineering. They can also meet their own professional goals through the selection of professional electives in these areas as well as construction management. Professional electives are selected in consultation with the student’s advisor to satisfy ABET, Inc.’s accreditation requirements.

The major requires 128 credits.

Freshman Year First semester: 16 credits

CHM 101 (3), 102 (1); EGR 105 (1); MTH 141 (4); PHY 203 (3), 273 (1), and general education requirement (3).

Second semester: 16 credits

EGR 106 (2); MTH 142 (4); PHY 204 (3), 274 (1); ECN 201 (3) (S), and general education requirement (3).

Sophomore Year First semester: 17 credits

CVE 205 (1); MCE 262 (3); MTH 243 (3), GEO 103 (4); and general education requirements (6).

Second semester: 16 credits

CVE 220 (3), 230 (1); MCE 263 (3); MTH 244 (3), and general education requirements (6).

Junior Year First semester: 17 credits

CVE 346 (3), 354 (3), 355 (1), 374 (3), 381 (3), 382 (1), and MCE 354 (3).

Second semester: 17 credits

CVE 370 (3), 375 (1), 347 (3), 348 (1); STA 409 (3), general education requirement (3), and one 3-credit engineering elective (details follow).

Senior YearFirst semester: 14 credits

CVE 465 (3), 497 [capstone] (2), general education requirement (3), and two 3-credit professional electives (details follow).

Second semester: 15 credits

CVE 483 (3), 498 [capstone] (3), free elective (3), and two 3-credit professional electives (details follow).

Electives. Three of the twelve credits of required professional electives must be selected from the following courses: CVE 470, 471, 475, 478. The remaining nine credits are to be selected from the list in the Civil Engineering Undergraduate Student Handbook. It is recommended that students consider selecting from the Civil Engineering professional elective courses to satisfy the free elective requirement.The three credits of engineering electives are to be selected from the list in the Civil Engineering Undergraduate Student Handbook.

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Computer Engineering

The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in computer engineering is offered by the Department of Electrical, Computer, and Biomedical Engineering and is accredited by ABET, Inc. Specialization in computer engineering is also available within the Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) programs in electrical engineering.

Coordinator: Professor Lo (Electrical, Computer, and Biomedical Engineering). Professors Ohley and Qing Yang; Associate Professor Sendag; Assistant Professor Yan Sun; Professor-in-Residence Uht.

Program Educational Objectives. The objectives of the computer-engineering program at URI are the following:

1) Produce graduates who are able to practice computer engineering to serve government agencies and state, regional, national, and international industries.

2) Produce graduates with the necessary background and technical skills to work professionally in one or more of the following areas: computer hardware and software design, computer-based systems, network design, system integration, or electronic design automation.

3) Prepare graduates for personal and professional success with awareness and commitment to their ethical and social responsibilities, both as individuals and in team environments.

4) Prepare graduates who are capable of entering and succeeding in an advanced degree program in a field such as engineering, science, or business.

Program Description. Digital computer and communication systems have transformed society in a profound way. The examples range from super powerful scientific computers, the Internet and the World Wide Web, to cell phones and smart cards. Traditionally, computer engineering has been a discipline that combines both electrical engineering and computer science. The URI computer engineering program is thus designed so the students will have a strong foundation in the relevant fields of electrical engineering and computer science, while establishing themselves with the latest computer engineering topics, such as advanced computer system architecture, design and programming, computer communication, electronic design automation, and high-level digital design methodologies.

The computer engineering core courses can be categorized as follows: (1) ELE 208/209, 305, and 408/409 are core courses for computer system architecture and hardware and software organization and interaction. (2) ELE 201/202, 306/307, and 405/406 are the core courses for digital design with electronic design automation and rapid prototyping, and for computer system integration. (3) ELE 313 and 437 and CSC 412 are core courses for computer communication and networks. The computer engineering program has two computer engineering electives and one free elective in the senior year so students can further expand into areas such as signals and systems, digital control, electronics, and computer software.

The computer engineering program culminates in the senior year with two major design experiences. First, ELE 408/409 is where all the skills accumulated through the curriculum will be employed in a group senior design project. Second, ELE 480 and 481 provide each student with the opportunity to work in a multi-disciplinary team in a senior capstone design project.

Graduates from the program go on to positions in both government agencies and the private sector, or enter graduate school for further study. Many computer engineering undergraduate students work with faculty on research projects before entering graduate school.

To transfer from University College to the College of Engineering’s computer engineering program, students must have completed all science, mathematics, and engineering courses required during the first two semesters with a grade point average of 2.00 or better.

Minimum Requirements

Humanities and Social Sciences (27 credits): see the general education requirements for the College of Engineering. Students should consult their advisors regarding distribution of credits and approved courses. (ECN 201 is included in the 27-credit total.)

Mathematics (20 credits): MTH 141, 142, 243, 362, 447, 451.

Basic Sciences (12 credits): CHM 101, 102; PHY 203, 273, 204, 274.

Computer Science (at least 8 credits): CSC 211, 212, and CE electives.

Engineering Sciences and Design (44 credits): ELE 201/202, 208/209, 212, 215, 301/302, 305, 313, 338/339, 400, 405/406, 408/409, 437, 480, 481.

Computer Engineering Elective (9-12 credits): Three courses from: BME 464/465, any ELE 300- to 400-level course not otherwise required by the major, any ELE 500-level course with petition, and CSC 301, 305, 402, 406, 412, 415, 436, 481, 485, and 486.

Free Elective (3 credits): Any course may be used as a free elective.

College of Engineering (3 credits): EGR 105, 106.

The major requires 126-129 credits.

Freshman YearFirst semester: 16 credits

MTH 141 (4); CHM 101 (3), 102 (1); PHY 203 (3), 273 (1); EGR 105 (1), and general education requirement (3).

Second semester: 16 credits

ELE 208 (2), 209 (1); MTH 142 (4); PHY 204 (3), 274 (1); ECN 201 (3), and EGR 106 (2).

Sophomore YearFirst semester: 17 credits

ELE 201 (3), 202 (1); MTH 362 (3); CSC 211 (4), and general education requirements (6).

Second semester: 15 credits

ELE 212 (3), 215 (2); MTH 243 (3); CSC 212 (4), and general education requirement (3).

Junior YearFirst semester: 16 credits

ELE 305 (3), 313 (3), 338 (3), 339 (1); MTH/CSC 447 (3), and general education requirement (3).

Second semester: 16-17 credits

ELE 301 (3), 302 (1); MTH 451 (3); computer engineering elective (3-4; details follow), and general education requirements (6).

Senior Year: (30-32 credits)

ELE 400 (1), 405 (3), 406 (1), 408 (3), 409 (1), 437 (3), 480 (3), 481 (3), computer engineering elective (6-8; details follow), free elective (3), and general education requirement (3).

Electives. Nine or more credits from the following courses: BME 464/465; any ELE 300- or 400-level course not otherwise required by the major, any ELE 500-level course with petition, and CSC 301, 305, 402, 406, 412, 415, 436, 481, 485, 486. See your advisor for help in preparing a suitable senior-year program.

Minor in Computer Engineering. Students who are interested in pursuing a minor in computer engineering are encouraged to speak with the department chair to discuss course requirements.

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Electrical Engineering

The Department of Electrical, Computer, and Biomedical Engineering offers a curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. The department also offers the Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees.

Faculty: Professor Boudreaux-Bartels, chairperson. Professors Fischer, Jackson, Kay, Kumaresan, Lo, Mardix, Ohley, Ying Sun, Sunak, Swaszek, Vaccaro, and Q. Yang; Associate Professors Sendag and Vetter; Assistant Professors Besio, Huang, and Yan Sun; Professor-in-Residence Uht; Adjunct Professors Banerjee and Cooley; Adjunct Assistant Professors Davis and Sepe; Professors Emeriti Daly, Haas, Lengyel, Lindgren, Mitra, Sadasiv, Spence, and Tufts.

Program Educational Objectives. The objectives of URI’s electrical engineering program are the following:

1) Produce graduates who are able to practice electrical engineering to serve government agencies or state, regional, national, and international industries.

2) Produce graduates with the necessary background and technical skills to work professionally in one or more of the following areas: analog electronics, digital electronics, communication systems, computer-based systems, or control systems.

3) Prepare graduates for personal and professional success with awareness of and commitment to their ethical and social responsibilities, both as individuals and in team environments.

4) Prepare graduates who are capable of entering and succeeding in an advanced degree program in a field such as engineering, science, or business.

Program Description. Since electrical instrumentation is at the heart of modern science and technology, electrical engineers are employed not only in the computer, electronics, communications, and power industries, but also in diverse enterprises such as transportation, the chemical industry, large hospitals, and government laboratories.

The curriculum emphasizes the scientific basis of electrical engineering and the application of mathematical analysis to engineering problems. Work is required in network and systems theory, atomic physics and solid state, electromagnetic theory, and electronics. Creative use of scientific principles in problems of engineering design is stressed, particularly in the senior year. The development of computer hardware and software is a part of many electrical engineering courses.

Extensive laboratory work serves to bridge the gap between mathematical analysis and the real world of “hardware.” Separate undergraduate laboratories are available for electrical measurements, analog electronics, digital electronics, microprocessors, hardware description languages, embedded systems, control systems, optics, communications, and electronic materials.

Electrical engineering students should note that the four-year electrical engineering curriculum allows for three credits of completely free electives that do not have to satisfy any of the general education requirements. Although the natural science requirement will be satisfied automatically by courses specified in the electrical engineering curriculum, it is recommended that students take some additional courses in mathematics or physics for which the prerequisites have been satisfied.

To transfer from University College to the College of Engineering’s electrical engineering program, students must have completed all science, mathematics, and engineering courses required during the first two semesters with a grade point average of 2.00 or better.

Minimum Requirements

Humanities and Social Sciences (27 credits): see the general education requirements for the College of Engineering. Students should consult their advisors regarding distribution of credits and approved courses. (ECN 201 is included in the 27-credit total.)

Mathematics (at least 14 credits): MTH 141, 142, 243, 362, and MTH 451 or ISE 411.

Basic Sciences (19 credits): CHM 101, 102; PHY 203, 273, 204, 274, 205, 275, 306.

Computer Science (4 credits): CSC 200.

Engineering Sciences and Design (58-63 credits): EGR 105, 106; ELE 201, 202, 205, 206, 212, 215, 301, 302, 313, 314, 322, 331, 338, 339, 343, 344, 400, 480, 481; ISE 411, three electrical engineering design electives (chosen from BME/ELE 461; BME 464/465; ELE 401/402, 405/406, 408/409, 423, 427/428, 432, 435/436, 437, 438, 444/445, 447/448, 457, 458/459; one of these courses must be chosen from ELE 408/409, 427/428, 436/437, 444/445, 447/448, 458/459).

Free Elective: (3 credits): Any course may be used as a free elective.

The major requires 128-130 credits.

Freshman YearFirst semester: 16 credits

EGR 105 (1); CHM 101 (3), 102 (1); MTH 141 (4); PHY 203 (3), 273 (1), and general education requirement (3).

Second semester: 17 credits

EGR 106 (2); ECN 201 (3); MTH 142 (4); PHY 204 (3), 274 (1), and CSC 200 (4).

Sophomore YearFirst semester: 17 credits

MTH 362 (3); PHY 205 (3), 275 (1); ELE 201 (3), 202 (1), and general education requirements (6).

Second semester: 17 credits

ELE 205 (2), 206 (1), 212 (3), 215 (2); MTH 243 (3); PHY 306 (3), and general education requirement (3).

Junior YearFirst semester: 17 credits

ELE 313 (3), 331 (4), 338 (3), 339 (1); MTH 451 (3) or ISE 411 (3), and general education requirement (3).

Second semester: 15 credits

ELE 301 (3), 302 (1), 314 (3), 322 (4), 343 (3), and 344(1).

Senior YearTotal credits for two semesters: 29-31. See your advisor for help in preparing a suitable program.

ELE 400 (1), 480 (3), 481 (3), general education requirements (9), free elective (3), and three electrical engineering design electives (10-12; details follow).

Electrical Engineering Design Electives. May be chosen as any three of the following: BME 462/463, 464/465; ELE 401/402, 405/406, 408/409, 423, 427/428, 432, 435/436, 437, 438, 444/445, 447/448, 457, 458/459. However, one of the courses must be chosen from BME 462/463; ELE 408/409, 427/428, 435/436, 444/445, 447/448, 458/459.

Minor in Electrical Engineering. Students who are interested in pursuing a minor in electrical engineering are encouraged to speak with the department chair to discuss course requirements.

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Industrial and Systems Engineering

The Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering offers an ABET, Inc.-accredited curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in industrial and systems engineering. The department also offers the Master of Science (M.S.) degree in systems engineering and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in industrial and systems engineering. In collaboration with the College of Business Administration, qualified students could choose to pursue a Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) degree that will take one extra year following their completion of the B.S. in industrial and systems engineering.

Faculty: Professor Wang, chair. Professors Dewhurst and Sodhi; Associate Professor Maier-Speredelozzi; Adjunct Professors Jones and Miller; Professors Emerti Boothroyd, Knight, and Nichols; Associate Professor Emeritus Shao.

Program Mission Statement. Consistent with the mission of the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, URI’s B.S. program in industrial and systems engineering will prepare students for successful careers that require a foundation of technical ability, high ethical standards, and good communication skills.

Program Educational Objectives. Graduates of the industrial and systems engineering program will be:

1) Prepared to practice professionally in the fields of industrial and systems engineering for both manufacturing and service sectors, and able to work in a wide range of areas such as systems engineering, quality engineering, logistics, management engineering, human factors, health care, and transportation.

2) Equipped with a foundation of technical ability, high ethical standards, and good communication skills for success in their future careers.

3) Prepared to successfully pursue advanced degrees through an environment that values both scholarly research and technical education.

Curriculum Objectives. Consistent with these program objectives, it is expected that graduates from the Bachelor of Science in Industrial and Systems Engineering will have:

1) appropriate fundamental understanding of mathematics, physics, chemistry and other basic sciences;

2) basic computer skills consistent with application to industrial and systems engineering problem solving;

3) basic engineering knowledge across a range of subjects including mechanics, materials, thermodynamics, and electrical circuits;

4) understanding of basic economics and accounting, together with approaches to economics based decision-making;

5) thorough grounding in probability and statistics as applied to industrial and systems engineering problems;

6) practice in designing, developing, and analyzing integrated systems that involve people, materials, equipment, and energy;

7) knowledge of basic manufacturing processes and the relationship between product design and manufacturing efficiency;

8) advanced knowledge in student-selected topics in industrial and systems engineering, manufacturing engineering, and other related disciplines;

9) experience with individual and team-based engineering problem solving;

10) practical and hands-on experience solving engineering problems involving measuring physical phenomena and interpreting results;

11) understanding of ethics of engineering activities;

12) understanding of the relationships between engineering and society in general;

13) understanding of the necessity for lifelong learning;

14) well-developed written communication skills and experiences of oral communications both individually and in groups; and

15) broad understanding of society in general by exposure to fine arts, literature, history, philosophy, social science, and foreign cultures.

Program Curriculum. The industrial and systems engineering curriculum is designed to provide significant strength in mathematics, basic science, and engineering science, together with a carefully coordinated set of courses of particular importance to the professional industrial or systems engineer. Fundamental manufacturing processes, economics, statistics, quality systems, and mathematical and computer modeling of production and service systems are included.

The major requires 125 credits.

Freshman YearFirst semester: 16 credits

CHM 101 (3), 102 (1); PHY 203 (3), 273 (1); EGR 105 (1); MTH 141 (4), and general education requirement (3).

Second semester: 16 credits

ECN 201 (3); EGR 106 (2); MTH 142 (4); PHY 204 (3), 274 (1), and general education requirement (3).

Sophomore YearFirst semester: 17 credits

ISE 240 (3), 241 (1); MCE * 262 (3); MTH 243 (3); PHY 2055 * (3), 275 (1). * Please see "Addendum to 2009–2010 URI Catalog" for an addition or correction to this information.

Second semester: 16 credits

CVE 220 (3); ELE 220 (3); ISE 220 (1); MCE 263 (3); MTH 362 or 244 (3), and general education requirement (3).

Junior YearFirst semester: 15 credits

CHE 333 (3); EGR 316 or PHL 212 (3); ISE 325 (3), 411 (3), 432 (3).

Second semester: 15 credits

BUS 201 (3); ISE 404 (3), 412 (3), 433 (3), and professional elective (3).

Senior YearFirst semester: 15 credits

ISE 451 (3), professional elective (3), free elective (3), and general education requirements (6).

Second semester: 15 credits

ISE 452 (3), professional electives (6), and general education requirements (6).

General education (indicated in several places above) refers to the electives in the University’s general education program, required in all curriculums leading to a bachelor’s degree.

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Mechanical Engineering

The Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics offers a curriculum leading to the B.S. degree in mechanical engineering. The B.S. degree in mechanical engineering is accredited by ABET, Inc. The department also offers the Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in mechanical engineering and applied mechanics.

Faculty: Professor Taggart, chair. Professors Chelidze, Datseris, Faghri, Ghonem, Jouaneh, Palm, Sadd, Shukla, and Zhang; Associate Professors Meyer and Rousseau; Assistant Professor Park; Adjunct Professor Anagnostopoulos.

Department Mission and Program Objectives. URI’s Mechanical Engineering department fully follows the college’s mission statement. The University’s mechanical engineering program is more than just a collection of courses and credit hours; it has been carefully designed to prepare students for the profession of mechanical engineering through study, experience, and practice. Although strong educational objectives existed in the program for many years, the department recently carefully reviewed and redeveloped its objectives and outcomes.

Program Educational Objectives. These are related to career and professional accomplishments that the program prepares students to achieve after graduation.

1) Produce graduates who are able to successfully practice mechanical engineering to serve state, local, national, and international industries and government agencies.

2) Produce graduates with the necessary background and technical skills to work professionally as individuals or in teams in the two major stems of mechanical engineering including mechanical and thermal systems.

3) Prepare graduates for personal and professional success with an understanding and appreciation of ethical behavior, social responsibility, and diversity, both as individuals and in team environments.

4) Prepare graduates to be interested, motivated, and capable of pursuing continued lifelong learning through further graduate education, short courses, or other training programs in engineering or related fields.

Desired Program Outcomes. Mechanical engineering students demonstrate knowledge in all the outcomes required by ABET, Inc. and listed in the College of Engineering’s description.

The curriculum provides a thorough and well-rounded foundation in basic science, mathematics, engineering science, and general education to prepare the graduate for a professional engineering career. The curriculum is also excellent preparation for graduate school. The program is strong in providing a background in design, solid and fluid mechanics, systems engineering, and the thermal sciences, including energy and energy transfer. Computer applications are stressed throughout the curriculum. All undergraduates are invited and encouraged to join the student section of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, which sponsors industrial plant visits, special lectures, and other activities. Students may also join chapters of the Society of Automotive Engineers and the Society for Experimental Mechanics.

The work in the first two years consists of basic courses in science (math, physics, chemistry), applied science (mechanics, electricity and magnetism, basic computer literacy and computer-aided problem solving), manufacturing processes, and general education requirements (humanities, social sciences, English communication). A pair of introductory engineering courses are included in the freshman year.

The junior year concentrates on fundamental courses in mechanical engineering (thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, systems engineering, engineering analysis, heat transfer), materials sciences, and design of machines. Further general education studies are also covered.

The senior year in mechanical engineering includes the capstone design sequence, mechanical engineering experimentation, and a wide variety of professional electives such as mechanical control systems, advanced fluid mechanics, advanced mechanics of materials, mechatronics, internal combustion engines, applied energy conversion, tribology, product design for manufacture, air conditioning, heating and ventilation, vibrations, finite element method, and experimental stress analysis. The program also includes two laboratory courses in the junior and senior years, which introduce experimental techniques and provide practical experience with the engineering phenomena covered in the classroom.

Computer techniques are integrated throughout the curriculum. Computational facilities including personal computers and workstations are available in the College of Engineering’s Computer Center and the University’s Office of Information Services. The department’s computer classroom provides state-of-the-art hardware and software for simulation, design, and product development.

To receive the Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering, the student must satisfactorily complete all the courses in the following curriculum, which requires 130 credits.

Freshman YearFirst semester: 16 credits

CHM 101 (3), 102 (1); EGR 105 (1); MTH 141 (4); PHY 203 (3), 273 (1), and a general education requirement (3).

Second semester: 16 credits

ECN 201 (3); EGR 106 (2); MTH 142 (4); PHY 204 (3), 274 (1) and a general education requirement (3).

Sophomore YearFirst semester: 17 credits

MCE 201 (3), 262 (3); MTH 243 (3); PHY 205 (3), 275 (1); ISE 240 (3) and 241 (1).

Second semester: 15 credits

CVE 220 (3); ELE 220 (3); MCE 263 (3); MTH 244 (3), and general education requirement (3).

Junior YearFirst semester: 18 credits

CHE 333 (3); MCE 301 (3), 341 (3), 354 (3), 372 (3); and general education requirement (3).

Second semester: 18 credits

MCE 302 (3), 313 (3), 366 (3), 448 (3), and general education requirements (6).

Senior YearFirst semester: 15 credits

MCE 401 [capstone] (3), 414 (3), professional electives (6; details follow), and general education requirement (3).

Second semester: 15 credits

MCE 402 [capstone] (3), professional electives (6; details follow), free elective (3), and general education requirement (3).

Professional Electives. Must be satisfied by a minimum of three three-credit elective courses in mechanical engineering, two of which must be taken at URI. The fourth course may be a 300-, 400-, or 500-level course offered by: the College of Engineering; or the Departments of Chemistry, Computer Science and Statistics, or Physics; or the Department of Mathematics (one 400- or 500-level course). Professional elective courses taken outside URI are subject to URI rules on transfer credit and require prior written approval.

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Ocean Engineering

The Department of Ocean Engineering offers a curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in ocean engineering; this program is accredited by ABET, Inc. and is open to qualified students under the New England Regional Student Program. URI’s Department of Ocean Engineering is nationally and internationally recognized as one of the leaders in ocean engineering, and also offers Master of Science (M.S.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees.

Faculty: Professor Miller, chairperson. Professors S. Grilli, Hu, Moran, Spaulding, Stepanishen, and Tyce; Associate Professor Baxter; Assistant Professor Roman; Associate Research Professor Vincent; Assistant Research Professors A. Grilli and Potty; Adjunct Professors Corriveau, Muench, Sharpe, and Shonting; Adjunct Assistant Professors Cousins and Newman; Professors Emeriti Kowalski, Middleton, and Silva.

Department Mission Statement and Educational Objectives. The Department of Ocean Engineering’s missions are to provide high-quality undergraduate and graduate degree programs that prepare our students for professional careers in ocean engineering in industry, academia, and government; to develop and maintain internationally recognized research programs in selected areas of ocean engineering; to actively serve the profession and community in our areas of expertise; and to provide a challenging work and learning environment where diversity, community, scholarship, professional development, and excellence are valued and rewarded. The program is designed to provide students with a strong base in fundamental sciences, mathematics, and engineering; a broad base in ocean engineering; opportunties for the integration of theory, experimentation, and design; appreciation of ethical, social, and environmental issues in the practice of the profession; and strong oral and written communication skills.

Program Educational Objectives. The educational objectives for the ocean engineering B.S. program have been developed in consultation with the department’s advisory board, alumni, graduate employers, and students. Graduates are prepared to:

1) Gain employment with private or government organizations and advance to positions of increased responsibility, or pursue an advanced degree in an engineering program.

2) Work in one of the specialty areas within the broad field of ocean engineering including ocean instrumentation, hydrostatics, ocean waves, underwater acoustics, marine structures, marine geomechanics, and ocean engineering design.

3) Behave ethically, contribute to society, participate in strengthening a diverse engineering professional environment, and succeed in diverse workplaces, nationally and internationally.

URI’s curriculum provides a basic ocean engineering program that gives students a firm base in engineering fundamentals and prepares them for direct entry into a professional career or continued study toward a graduate degree. The required ocean engineering courses begin at the freshman level and include laboratory, analysis, and design courses. There is a strong emphasis on the application of scientific principles in the ocean environment gained through laboratory courses. Experiments covering several basic areas are employed and provide an integrated approach to investigations into ocean phenomena and processes. Students are involved in the planning and execution of experiments, including collection and analysis of data and the reporting of results. This hands-on experience provides graduates with an understanding of ocean engineering activities in scientific and industrial fields. Two ocean engineering professional elective courses are also required.

The broad-based program exposes students to the following topics: ocean instrumentation and data analysis, underwater and sub-bottom acoustics, marine hydrodynamics, coastal and near shore processes, marine geomechanics, coastal and offshore structures, and corrosion.

To ensure that each student gains an in-depth knowledge of one of the ocean engineering disciplines, the curriculum allows sequences of courses in hydrodynamics, structures, geomechanics, acoustics, instrumentation, and data analysis. An Ocean Systems Design Project course in the senior year integrates previously obtained knowledge in a comprehensive design project. This experience may be obtained through an on-campus course, by participating in an ongoing research project, or through an off-campus internship in an ocean-oriented private company or government laboratory; this internship allows interested students to take advantage of the many opportunities available in the region.

The Department of Ocean Engineering is located at the University’s Narragansett Bay Campus. Computational facilities include personal computer and workstation rooms networked and connected to the Engineering Computer Laboratory and Office of Information Services. Extensive laboratory facilities are also available. The department often utilizes an 80-foot research vessel equipped with a fully integrated side-scan sonar and sub-bottom mapping system; this vessel is used for both lab courses and research. A remotely-operated vehicle is operated by the department. A 100-foot tow and wave tank and a large acoustics tank are located on the Bay Campus, as well as an electronics shop, machine shop, and the Marine Geomechanics Laboratory. These facilities are available to undergraduates for course work, research, and independent study.

This major requires 130 credits.

Freshman Year First semester: 16 credits

CHM 101 (3), 102 (1); EGR 105 (1); MTH 141 (4); PHY 203 (3), 273 (1); and general education elective (3).

Second semester: 17 credits

ECN 201 (3); EGR 106 (2); MTH 142 (4); OCE 101 (1); PHY 204 (3), 274 (1); and general education requirements (3).

Sophomore Year First semester: 17 credits

MCE 262 (3); MTH 243 (3); OCE 205 (3), 215 (1); PHY 205 (3), 275 (1); and general education elective (3).

Second semester: 16 credits

CVE 220 (3); MCE 263 (3); MTH 244 (3); OCE 206 (3), 216 (1); and free elective (3).

Junior Year First semester: 16 credits

MCE 354 (3); OCE 301 (4), 310 (3); professional elective (3; details follow), and general education elective (3).

Second semester: 16 credits

EGR 316 (3); OCE 307 (3), 311 (4), 471 (3); and general education elective (3).

Senior Year First semester: 17 credits

OCE 416 (2), 421 (3), 4951 (3); CHE 333 (3); general education elective (3), and professional elective (3; details follow).

Second semester: 15 credits

OCE 4961 (3); OCG 451 (3), professional electives (6; details follow), and general education elective (3).

Professional Electives. This requirement must be satisfied by a minimum of two approved three-credit elective courses at the 300-, 400-, or 500-level in engineering or oceanography and two approved three-credit courses in ocean engineering.

1 An approved off-campus experience, usually between the junior and senior years, can be substituted for OCE 495 and 496.


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