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2009-2010 Catalog Online

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College of Human Science and Services

INDEX

Curriculum Requirements

Communicative Disorders

Education

Human Development and Family Studies

Kinesiology

Textile Marketing

Textiles, Fashion Merchandising, and Design

William Lynn McKinney, Dean

Nancy Kelley, Assistant Dean

The College of Human Science and Services is a people-oriented college designed to focus on the human and material resources needed to help individuals and groups solve human problems encountered in contemporary society. Our programs prepare students for a variety of professions in teacher education, health-related fields, and fields that have evolved from URI’s historic land-grant mission in home economics. These programs include both formal and informal experiences with people in a wide variety of public service settings that enable students to develop the competencies needed in the field of human services. The teacher education programs offered through the college are outlined in the following departmental descriptions. For more information on teacher education programs, see Teacher Education Programs.

Degrees offered include a Bachelor of Science degree with majors in communicative disorders; human development and family studies; kinesiology; secondary education; textile marketing; and textiles, fashion merchandising, and design; and Bachelor of Arts degrees in elementary or secondary education.

The college sponsors a number of organizations and activities that provide special opportunities for students, including two child development centers, a family therapy clinic, historic textile and costume collection, computer laboratory, physical therapy clinic, and a speech and hearing clinic.

Minors. Students can declare a minor, which will appear on their transcripts as a category separate from their major. See Minor Fields of Study for details.

The college participates in the following interdisciplinary minors: gerontology, hunger studies, leadership studies, and special populations (see Minor Fields of Study). Details on minors offered within the college can be found later in this section.

Faculty

Communicative Disorders: Professor J. Singer, chairperson. Professors Kovarsky and Weiss; Associate Professor M. Kim; Assistant Professor Mahler; Clinical Assistant Professors Connors and Theadore; Adjunct Assistant Professor R. Singer.

School of Education: Professor Byrd, director. Professors Boulmetis, Eichinger, Favazza, McKinney, Purnell, Trostle Brand, G. Willis, and Young; Associate Professors Adamy, deGroot, Hicks, Peno, Seitsinger, and Shim; Assistant Professors Coiro, Deeney, and Kern; Research Associate Professor Brand; Instructor Fogleman; Professor Emeritus Heifetz.

Human Development and Family Studies: Professor J. Adams, chairperson. Professors J. Adams, Gray Anderson, Clark, Knott, Newman, and Xiao; Associate Professors Branch, Kalymun, McCurdy, Richmond, and Sparks; Assistant Professors S. Adams, Dice, Harper, Kisler, and Vaccaro; Adjunct Professors P. Newman and Prochaska; Adjunct Instructors Blumen, Kerbel, Penhallow, and Warford; Professors Emeriti Cohen, Maynard, and Schaffran.

Kinesiology: Professor Riebe, chairperson. Professors Lamont and Manfredi; Associate Professors Blissmer, Ciccomascolo, and Kusz; Assistant Professors Delmonico and Xu; Lecturers Doll, Hatfield, and Steen.

Textiles, Fashion Merchandising, and Design: Professor Welters, chairperson. Professors Bide and Ordonez; Associate Professors Harps-Logan and Hannel; Assistant Professors Kapstein and Kim; Adjunct Professor Emery.

Interdisciplinary Programs: Gerontology—Professor Clark, director; Human Science and Services—Dean McKinney, program head; Leadership Studies—Associate Professor Richmond, acting program head; Special Populations—Associate Professor Roush, acting program head.

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Curriculum Requirements

General Education Requirements. All students pursuing a bachelor’s degree in the college are required to develop a 39-credit program in general education within the framework listed on pages 33-35.

Students within the college must take, as part of their English communication requirement, a minimum of three credits from WRT 104, 105, or 106 and a minimum of three credits from COM 100; or as part of their social sciences requirement, a minimum of three credits from APG, PSY, and SOC courses approved for general education. Individual programs within the college may require specific courses.

Students in the elementary and secondary education program must follow the basic liberal studies requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Field Work. Many of the college’s academic programs require a supervised field work experience as part of the degree requirements. This experience is designed to provide students with the opportunity to apply classroom knowledge in a career-related setting. Placements are made in a wide variety of agencies such as public schools, health care facilities, child care centers, and other human service settings. Satisfactory completion of a required field experience depends on achievement of basic competencies established by the academic department in cooperation with the agency. The University supervisor is responsible for determining whether or not the student has attained the required competencies and, in some cases, may extend the time required for the experience until the student’s performance is satisfactory. If in the opinion of the University supervisor the performance of the student is unsatisfactory, and particularly if client/patient safety is at risk, the student may be removed from the field experience prior to the end of the semester or term.

Course Load. Approval of the advisor and the dean is needed for a schedule of more than 19 credits per semester.

Repeating Courses for Credit. Unless otherwise stated in the course description, a course cannot be repeated for credit. Credit can be counted only once toward the total credits required for graduation. Repeating courses in which a grade of C or better was earned requires approval of the student’s academic dean; students may need to take such courses on a pass-fail basis.

Curricular Modifications. In consultation with the advisor, and with the approval of the department chairperson, a student will be permitted to modify the normal requirements of the department in which the student is majoring. The decision of the department chair is final. Requirements outside the major may be modified only with the approval of the Scholastic Standing Committee of the College of Human Science and Services. Petition forms are available in the Office of the Dean. Minimum grade point average and total credit requirements are not petitionable.

Transfer Students. Transfer students should be advised that admission to some programs in the college requires meeting certain prerequisites or separate admission criteria. Teacher education programs in the School of Education, Department of Human Development and Family Studies, and the Department of Kinesiology have specific admission criteria and generally require that a matriculated student complete at least one semester of work at URI before applying for admission. Transfer students may be admitted to the University, but are not admitted directly into these programs.

The Plan for Early Contingent Admission to the D.P.T. Program in Physical Therapy requires careful and timely course planning typically beginning with the freshman year at URI. It is unlikely that transfer students would have the appropriate sequence of courses, including the prerequisites, that would allow them to take advantage of this option.

Students interested in any of the above programs should refer to the specific program descriptions on the following pages and consult the department for additional information.

Graduation. It is the responsibility of each student to file an Intent to Graduate form and curriculum work sheet approved by his or her advisor in the Dean’s Office. The deadline is September 15 for May graduation, April 5 for August graduation, and May 5 for December graduation.

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Communicative Disorders

This curriculum leads to a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. Students seeking admission to this program must receive a grade of C or better in CMD 160, 272, and 273 and maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.50. In addition to general education requirements and appropriate free electives, a major of 43 credits in communicative disorders includes 34 credits of required courses and nine credits of professional electives.

The required courses are CMD 160, 272, 273, 274, 276, 278, 361, 375, 377, 454, 460, 465, and 493. The remaining nine credits (three courses) must be selected from the following courses: BMS 312; COM 221, 251; CMD 440, 475, 491, 492; EDC 312; HDF 200, 201, 203, 312, 314, 400; HIS 117; HSS 120; LIB 120; LIN 200, 220; PSY 232, 254, 300, 388, 442; SOC 224; STA 220, 308.

With careful early planning, students can use free electives to achieve a double major or explore special-interest areas in depth. Students should anticipate the necessity for graduate study in speech-language pathology. The typical minimum entry requirement for graduate study is a grade point average of 3.00.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation.

Accelerated Bachelor’s-Master’s Degree Program in Speech-Language Pathology. URI sixth-semester students pursuing a B.S. degree in communicative disorders with 25 credits of electives remaining may apply for acceptance into an accelerated master’s degree program in speech-language pathology. This accelerated program is not available to non-URI undergraduates or part-time graduate students. Students accepted to these programs follow a specified sequence of graduate-level course work and clinical practicum during their senior year, and complete the master’s degree with an additional one year and one summer of full-time study in speech-language pathology. A cumulative grade point average of 3.00 overall and 3.20 in the major is required, with satisfactory MAT or GRE scores. Three letters of recommendation (two from URI communicative disorders faculty) are also needed. Students should indicate their intent to apply to the accelerated program in the graduate application materials.

Students in the speech-language pathology program are required to take a minimum of 24 credits in specified course work and practicum at the 400-500 level in the fifth year. Requirements for the M.S. in speech-language pathology are outlined in “Graduate Programs” (see Speech-Language Pathology for more information).

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Education

Curriculums in secondary education lead to the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degrees, the curriculum in elementary education to the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree. Students wishing to enroll in the early childhood education program must major in human development and family studies and seek admission to the teacher education component of this program, as outlined below. The Master of Arts (M.A.) degree programs in education are described in “Graduate Programs.”

The curriculums offer a balanced program of academic preparation and professional training. The required professional courses contribute directly to the student’s understanding the teacher’s role in society and developing teaching skills.

Successful completion of the early childhood education program leads to an initial teaching certificate for the pre-school and primary grades (PK-2), while completion of the elementary education program leads to an initial teaching certificate for grades 1-6. The secondary education program leads to an initial teaching certificate for a specific subject area in grades 7-12.

If you are a transfer student, see above for information on transferring into these programs.

Admission Requirements. Students interested in undergraduate teacher education programs must apply for admission to the Office of Teacher Education. Students interested in URI’s early childhood, elementary, and secondary education programs must submit a portfolio and sit for an interview as part of the admission process. Please visit http://www.uri.edu/hss/education for additional information.

Applications for admission to teacher education programs are normally submitted during the sophomore year. Applications will be reviewed by a departmental screening committee based on the following criteria: 1) recommendations from faculty and others who have knowledge of the candidate’s experience or interest in working in education; 2) a writing sample expressing career goals, experience in working with children, and expectations as a teacher; 3) passing scores on the PPST: Reading 172, Writing 171, Math 171 or a score of 1100 on the SAT; 4) the student’s academic record, including a cumulative grade point average of 2.50 or better. In addition, for the secondary education and music education programs, a grade point average of 2.50 or better in the Arts and Sciences major or specialization. Students applying to the early childhood education program must attain a C or better in HDF 203 or equivalent for acceptance into the program.

Students should consult with the elementary or HDF advisor at University College, the Office of Teacher Education, or the HSS advisor at the Providence Campus.

Due to limited staff and facilities, admission to the programs in early childhood and elementary education is limited. Some applicants meeting the minimum requirements may not be admitted due to limited space. Students should check with the School of Education, the Department of Human Development and Family Studies, or their University College advisor as early as possible for additional information.

Students denied admission can petition the department for a review of the decision. In such cases, the school’s screening committee meets to consider the appeal.

Applicants who fail to gain admission should seek counsel from an appropriate advisor. Students can reapply for admission but should understand that this may delay their anticipated graduation date.

Program Requirements. For courses required for early childhood education, see “Human Development and Family Studies” on the next page. For more information on teacher education programs, see Teacher Education Programs. For graduate teacher education programs, see the “Graduate Programs” section.

Students who are admitted to the elementary education program are required to complete a B.A. degree. Students must select a major in the College of Arts and Sciences, or biology in the College of the Environment and Life Sciences, in addition to the major in elementary education. Students must also fulfill the basic liberal studies requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences as they relate to double majors. See program requirements in the College of Arts and Sciences section.

The professional sequence courses required for elementary education are EDC 250, 312, 102 or 360, 402, 423 (or HDF 302) 424, 452, 453, 454, 455, 456, 457, 458, 459 and EDC 460. These courses are taken prior to student teaching. EDC 484 and 485 make up the student teaching experience. The following are also required and can be taken as part of the basic liberal studies requirements: COM 101; HIS 142; PSY 113, 232; WRT 104, 105, or 106; and a one-credit health education course or equivalent. Students should contact the School of Education for more details.

Students seeking to teach in a middle school must obtain a middle level endorsement and be eligible for elementary or secondary certification. The professional sequence of courses required for middle level endorsement is EDC 400, EDC 415 or an approved adolescent development course, and a practicum. These courses should be taken prior to student teaching. EDC 484 and 485 make up the student teaching semester. Teacher candidates seeking a middle level endorsement are required to teach in a middle school in addition to their elementary or secondary experience. In addition, 21-30 credits in one of the following content areas is required: English/language arts, mathematics, science, social studies, or foreign language. Final projects for each course must be uploaded into the electronic portfolio along with a self-reflection prior to the end of each course. Admission to the middle level endorsement program is contingent upon acceptance to the elementary or secondary education program. Prior to student teaching, candidates must successfully meet the standards for EDC 400 and the pre-student-teaching review, which includes review of all required courses and e-folio tasks by the secondary and elementary teams in conjunction with the middle level team and the Office of Teacher Education. Elementary education students should see a middle level advisor for specific course requirements.

The professional sequence courses required for secondary education are EDC 250, 312, 102 or 360, 371, 402, 430, 431, and 448. These courses are taken prior to student teaching. EDC 484 and 485 make up the student teaching semester. PSY 113 and HDF 310 or EDC 415 are also required. Students in secondary education are required to take a content area exam in their area of certification.

Students pursuing a program in secondary education normally obtain a B.A. degree, double majoring in education and their subject matter specialization, although a B.S. degree in secondary education is available in some specialization areas. Secondary education programs are offered in biology, chemistry, English, general science, history, mathematics, modern language, physics, and social studies.

Students in all programs must maintain minimum grade point averages of 2.50 overall, 2.50 in their education major, and 2.50 in their academic major area. To be eligible for student teaching, students must earn a grade of at least a C in EDC 430 and 448 (secondary); EDC 424, 425, 452, 453, 455, 456, 457, 458, and 460 (elementary); HDF 203, 301, 303, EDC 424, 426, and 429 (early childhood). Failure to maintain these grades and/or averages will result in “program probation,” a one-semester period during which students have the opportunity to earn acceptable grades but may not student teach. Failure to return grade averages to acceptable standing after one semester leads to dismissal from the program.

Students in the School of Education, graduate and undergraduate certification and licensure programs will be required to take and pass a content area exam(s) in their area of certification and any other exam required for state licensure prior to student teaching or final internship. Contact the Office of Teacher Education for the “passing” scores required for each discipline.

The major in elementary education requires 128 credits; secondary education requires 120 credits.

The School of Education has designated EDC 485 as its capstone course.

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Human Development and Family Studies

The curriculum in human development and family studies leads to a Bachelor of Science degree. The department also offers a certification program in family financial counseling and planning, as well as the Master of Science degree (see “Graduate Programs”).

The undergraduate B.S. curriculum provides a general background for work with children, families, and adults. Most professions in human development and family studies require academic work beyond the bachelor’s degree for continuing professional work and advancement. Individuals with a baccalaureate degree are employed, however, as professionals in nursery schools, child care centers, institutions and hospitals, and in recreational, child guidance, casework, and other community agencies. Students completing the program in family financial counseling and planning are employed in agencies providing family financial and credit counseling services.

Program student learning objectives: Graduates of the program in human development and family studies will acquire and utilize knowledge and skills necessary for a professional position or graduate/professional training in the human development and family studies field; understand and use methods of inquiry appropriate to this field, including relevant quantitative or qualitative analytic tools; use acquired knowledge, skills, and creativity to identify and solve complex human science problems; communicate clearly and effectively using a variety of methods; demonstrate a sense of responsibility to self, community, and society; and acquire knowledge and practice regarding the ethical principles and best practices in human development and family studies discipline. A more detailed description of the student learning objectives can be found at the HDF program Web site: http://www.uri.edu/hss/hdf.

Admission Requirements. Students seeking admission to this bachelor’s degree program must complete the following courses with an overall grade point average of 2.00 or better prior to acceptance for admission: HDF 200 or 201, PSY 113, any 100- or 200-level sociology course, and three general education credits in mathematics.

Program Requirements. Students are required to complete the following core curriculum:

1) a one-credit personal and career development course, HDF 180;

2) 15 credits of core courses including HDF 200, 201, 202, 205, and 230;

3) any two development courses—courses include HDF 203, 306, 310 and 311, 312, 314;

4) six to 12 credits of senior-level field experience chosen from the following options—HDF 480/481; HDF 477/478; EDC 484/485 (early childhood education students only); HDF 497; or the OIEE Internship Program (see OIEE Internship Program).

Additionally, students are required to complete a 12-credit concentration in one of the following three areas:

Professional Content for Child Settings: any 12 credits—HDF 357, 400, 430, 432, 434, 455 and 456, HDF 302 or EDC 425, HDF 305.

Professional Content for Family and Community Settings: any 12 credits—HDF 357, 418, 421, 428, 430, 431, 432, 433, 434, 437, 440.

Professional Content for Family Finance: any 12 credits—HDF 418, 424, 426, 428, 451.

To enhance their concentrations, students must also complete 12 credits of professional electives including HDF 450. Professional electives must be approved in consultation with an advisor, and nine of the 12 credits must be at the 300 level or above. Field experience does not meet this requirement.

Students must have from 19 to 31 credits of free electives to reach the 120-credit B.S. degree requirements.

For information on transferring into this program, see HSS Transfer Students.

Minor in Family Financial Counseling and Planning. Students outside the Department of Human Development and Family Studies may declare a minor in family financial counseling and planning by completing 18 credits as follows: HDF 418, 424, 426, 450, 451, and one of the following courses: HDF 205, 210, 225, or 428.

Certification Program in Family Financial Counseling and Planning. Students will take HDF 418, 424, 426, 428, 450, and 451; and HDF 477, 478 for their senior fieldwork experience. Non-HDF majors should also take HDF 205.

Early Childhood Education. A portion of the courses in the HDF curriculum, plus certain others in education, meet the requirements for the initial Early Childhood Education Certificate (nursery through grade 2) in Rhode Island. Students who wish to meet the requirements for this certificate in Rhode Island must apply to Early Childhood Education through the Office of Teacher Education. SeeTeacher Education Programs for admission requirements, certification in other states, and other information regarding teacher education.

Students complete an application and develop an admission portfolio during the sophomore year. The portfolio includes materials in the following areas: interpersonal and communication skills, academics, experience with children in community settings, and diversity experiences. Students must sit for an interview and take several examinations. Because there are only nine credits of free electives in the program, early consultation with an HDF advisor is important if students are to finish their degree in a timely manner.

URI’s curriculum, shown below, meets the mandates for beginning teachers set by Rhode Island’s Department of Education. Curriculum requirements for the Early Childhood Education (ECE) Certificate are as follows (in this order):

Prior to acceptance into early childhood education: 1) 39 credits of general education courses (to be taken prior to formal application, including EDC 102, 250, and 312, and NFS 207); after acceptance into ECE program: 2) 16 credits of core courses including HDF 180, 200, 201, 202, 205, and 230; 3) professional content courses totaling 13 credits; these are specific courses that are already required plus one 400-level course (HDF 203, HDF 302 or EDC 425, HDF 357, HDF 400 or 432); 4) certificate program (total 27 credits)—EDC 102, 250, 312, 402, 426 and 350, 429, 424; HDF 301, 303; and 5) final 15-credit senior-level field experience, EDC 484/485 Student Teaching and Seminar.

To be eligible for student teaching, students must maintain a grade point average of 2.50 overall and 2.50 in the major, and attain a grade of at least C in HDF 203, 301, 303, EDC 402, 424, 426, and 429. Failure to maintain these averages will result in “program probation,” a one-semester period during which students have the opportunity to earn acceptable grades but may not continue on the early childhood course sequence or student teach. Failure to return grade averages to acceptable standing after one semester will lead to dismissal from the program.

URI’s early childhood education program totals 111 credits plus nine credits of free electives; 120 credits are required for graduation.

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Kinesiology

This curriculum in kinesiology leads to a Bachelor of Science degree. The major is designed for students who plan to pursue careers in the broad fields of exercise science, health fitness, and physical and health teacher education. Students can prepare for certification as a public school teacher (physical and health education K-12) including endorsement in adapted physical education. For those interested in alternative careers in kinesiology, options are offered in exercise science, health fitness, and general studies in kinesiology. The department also offers a Master of Science degree and a teacher certification preparation program (see “Graduate Programs”).

The Department of Kinesiology offers up-to-date research and teaching facilities, including laboratories for biochemistry, electron microscopy, bone density, health fitness, body composition, plethysmoraphy, and human performance.

Students seeking admission to this program must have completed 24 credits including BIO 101 and BIO 121. In addition, students entering the program must have a minimum GPA of 2.00 and must have received a grade of C (2.00) or better in BIO 121.

Kinesiology Options. Students are strongly advised to seek guidance from their advisor in planning their course of study and choosing a focus area.

Exercise Science Option. The exercise science option prepares students to analyze physical activity, exercise, and sport in a physiological context, with an emphasis on basic science courses. This option is for students considering careers or graduate degrees in health care professions: exercise physiology, cardiac rehabilitation, physical therapy, physician’s assistant, and occupational therapy. Students in this option are required to have a cumulative grade point average from KIN core and specialization requirements of 2.50 or higher before completing supervised field work.

Health Fitness Option. This option promotes the understanding of the benefits of physical activity and is designed for students interested in becoming health fitness practitioners. Career opportunities exist in corporate, community, commercial, and hospital-based fitness and wellness centers. Students will be prepared to become certified health/fitness specialists, strength and conditioning specialists, or personal trainers. This option also prepares students for continuing study in exercise science, fitness management, health promotion, preventive medicine, and related fields. Students in this option are required to have a cumulative grade point average from KIN core and specialization requirements of 2.50 or higher before completing supervised field work.

Physical Education and Health Education Teacher Education Option. This option is designed for students seeking teacher certification in physical education and health education at the elementary and secondary levels. Completion of the NCATE approved certification program fulfills the requirement for teacher certification in Rhode Island and the majority of other states. Students interested in undergraduate teacher education programs must apply for admission to URI’s Office of Teacher Education. Applications for admission to teacher education programs are normally submitted during the sophomore year. A departmental screening committee reviews the applications. The committee’s decision is based on the following criteria: 1) recommendations from faculty and others who have knowledge of the candidate’s experience or interest in working in education; 2) a writing sample expressing career goals, experience working with children, and expectations as a teacher; 3) passing scores on the PPST (Reading 172, Writing 171, Math 171) or a score of 1100 on the SAT; 4) interview with presentation of admission portfolio; 5) completion of at least 30 credits of coursework including KIN 270; and 6) an overall GPA of 2.50 or better and grades of C or better in KIN 270, COM 100, and WRT 104, 105, or 106. If denied admission, students can petition the department for a decision review. Applicants who fail to gain admission should seek counsel from an appropriate advisor. Students may reapply for admission to the teacher education program but should understand that this may delay their anticipated graduation date. Students in the physical and health education teacher education program are required to have a cumulative grade point average of 2.70 or higher in KIN courses before student teaching (EDC 486/7). Students in the physical and health education teacher education certification and licensure program are required to take and pass the Praxis II: Principles of Learning and Teaching (PLT) Test and the Physical Education Content Knowledge Test prior to student teaching. Contact the Office of Teacher Education for the “passing” scores required for each test.

Early Contingent Admission to URI Physical Therapy Program Option. This advanced specialization is designed for highly qualified students who have decided on a career in physical therapyand wish to attend the URI D.P.T. program. Students successfully following this track will be allowed to apply for the URI D.P.T. program during their junior year. Following acceptance, credits earned the first year in the physical therapy program will be used to complete the B.S. degree in kinesiology. Students in this track must complete the following requirements to stay in this accelerated program: 1) complete the required course sequence and have a 3.20 or higher GPA at the completion of freshman year; 2) receive a minimum grade of 3.00 in BIO 121; 3) complete the required course sequence and have a 3.30 or higher GPA at the completion of sophomore year; and 4) complete the required course sequence and have a GPA of 3.40 or higher following the first semester of the junior year. Students applying for early contingent admission must also complete all admission requirements set by the D.P.T. program (see “Physical Therapy” in the “Graduate Programs” section of this catalog). Completion of this specialization does not guarantee admission into URI’s D.P.T. program.

General. This option is designed for the student who desires a broad experience in kinesiology. It may also be used for students transferring into the department.

Degree Requirements. The following courses are required of all students in kinesiology: URI 101 (1 credit), 40 credits of general education including WRT 104, 105, or 106; COM 100; BIO 101; and PSY 113. Core curriculum requirements (16 credits) include BIO 121, 242; KIN 334, 278, and 370. A total of 120 credits is required for graduation from exercise science, health fitness, early contingent physical therapy, and general options. A total of 135 credits is required for graduation from the physical and health education teacher education option. Specific requirements for the different degree options are listed below.

Teacher certification requirements include: KIN 270, 304, 305, 307, 309, 310, 314, 315, 324, 368, 380, 382, 401, 410; PSY 232, 460; EDC 312, 485, 486/487; NFS 207; NUR 150; MIC 201; HDF 357; 7 credits of practicum activity including KIN 116, 117, 118, 121, 222, 322, and 324, 6 credits of approved adaptive physical education courses. There are no free electives.

Requirements in the health fitness option include KIN 105L, 120, 275, 325, 335, 369, 382, 420, 425, 484, 486; NFS 207, and a health promotion course. Additionally, to reach the required 120 credits, students take nine credits of free electives and select 12 credits from the following specialized electives: BCH 211; BSL 333; BUS 140, 201, 202, 340, 441; CHM 124; COM 202, 221, 324, 351; HDF 201, 314, 357, 450; NFS 360, 441, 444; KIN 243, 391, 441, 475, 478; PHY 111, 112, 185, 186; PSY 103; SOC 224; WRT 227, 235.

The exercise science option requires CHM 105, 124, 126; BCH 211; BIO 244; NFS 207; KIN 275, 325, 335, 369, 420, 484, and 486. Additionally there are 15-17 credits selected from specialized electives and 6-8 credits of free electives. Students may need to use free electives to complete requirements for many graduate programs. Specialization electives that students may choose from are BIO 445, 451, 453; BCH 464; NFS 360, 441, 444; MIC 211; KIN 120, 243, 391, 414, 475, 478; PHY 111, 112, 185, 186; PSY 232, 300; SOC 100, 224; STA 307, 308, 409, 412. In addition, students applying for URI’s physical therapy program must take the following classes as specialization or free electives: PHY 111, 185, 112, 186; MTH 111; a basic statistics course (through ANOVA) and a second level psychology course (developmental or abnormal psychology preferred).

The early contingent physical therapy program requires that the following classes be completed during the first five semesters of study: BIO 101, 121, 242, 244; CHM 103, 105, 124, 126; COM 100; KIN 243, 275, 278, 325, 334, 335, 370; MTH 111; PHY 111, 112, 185, 186; PSY 113, 232, 300; WRT 104; and 12 credits of general education courses. Other requirements include KIN 420; FSN 207; nine credits of general education courses. During the fifth and sixth semesters, the first year physical therapy graduate curriculum is followed.

Requirements specific to the general option include KIN 243, 270, 275, 369, 382, 475 or 478; PSY 255; NSF 207; and HDF 357. Additionally, students must complete 18 credits in a department-approved focus area, or complete a University-approved minor. Students also complete courses to fulfill the general education requirements, and the kinesiology core courses that are common to all options in the department.

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Textile Marketing

This interdepartmental curriculum leads to a Bachelor of Science degree. It combines the professional requirements of a major in textiles with the requirements of the College of Business Administration and is designed to prepare students for wholesale and retail marketing positions in the textile industry.

Textile marketing managers are responsible for planning and directing the flow of textile products from manufacturers to consumers. The major, which provides a strong background in both textiles and marketing, is designed to give students the opportunity to explore the areas of manufacturing, market research, consumer behavior, advertising, promotion, fashion, and sales.

Freshmen who complete a minimum of 27 credits with an overall grade point average of 3.00 or higher and who complete CSC 101 and MTH 131 (or their equivalents BUS 110 and 111) with a B or higher will be admitted to the College of Human Science and Services at the end of the freshman year. Student who have a minumum of 42 credits, a grade point average of 2.40 or higher, and who have successfully (with an average of 2.40 or higher) completed CSC 101, MTH 131, STA 308 (or their equivalents BUS 110, 111, 210), BUS 201, and ECN 201 after the first semester of the sophomore year will be admitted to the College of Human Science and Services. Students not meeting these requirements may be eligible to transfer to the textiles, fashion merchandising, and design program.

Students in this curriculum must take the following courses: TMD 103, 224, 3031, 313, 402, 403, 4332; one of the following: TMD 240, 440, or 441; six credits of TMD electives; BUS 201, 202, 315, 341, 365, 366, 367; CSC 101; or nine credits from BUS 360, 448, 449, 450, 465, 467 or 468; MTH 131; and STA 308, 412. Students must also take the following courses to complete general education requirements: CHM 101/102 or 103/105; one of the following: BIO 105, MIC 190, NFS 207, PHY 109/110, PHY 111/185, or PHY 112/186; and ECN 201, 202.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation.

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Textiles, Fashion Merchandising, and Design

This curriculum leads to a Bachelor of Science degree. The Master of Science (M.S.) program is described in the “Graduate Programs” section.

The major is open to men and women with ability and professional interest in the artistic and technical aspects of the subject. Specialized programs of study prepare students for careers in the design, development, manufacture, and merchandising of textiles, apparel, and interior furnishings. Qualified students can prepare for graduate studies.

The following core courses are required: TMD 103, 224, 232, 3031, 313, 402, 4332; one of the following: TMD 240, 440, or 441; one of the following pairs: 1) TMD 226, and 326 or 426; 2) TMD 327, and 222 or 325; ART 101, 207; ARH 120, 251, or 252; CHM 101/102 or 103/105; ECN 201 and 202; one of the following: BIO 105, MIC 190, NFS 207, PHY 109/110, PHY 111/185, or PHY 112/186. Twelve credits of TMD electives (six credits must be upper-level courses and no more than three credits from TMD 361, 362, or 461, 462) and 18 credits of professional electives (nine credits from any one area) are required. Students should choose TMD electives and professional electives in consultation with an academic advisor. Students must complete 24 credits with an overall 2.00 GPA and complete CHM 101 or 103, and TMD 103 and the general education mathematics requirement with a 2.00 average to transfer to the College of Human Science and Services. (The same requirements apply to students wishing to transfer into TMD from other majors.) TMD 402 is the capstone experience in this major. To complement classroom and laboratory/studio instruction, internships and study abroad are encouraged.

A total of 120 credits is required for graduation.

Apparel Studies. Students choosing this area of emphasis should select 12 credits of electives from TMD 222, 325, 327, 335, 345, 346, 355, and an additional 18 credits of professional electives3 from art, business, or theatre.

Fashion Merchandising. Students choosing this area of emphasis should select 12 credits of electives from TMD 222, 232, 332, 432, 442, 452, and an additional 18 credits of professional electives3 from business and/or art.

Interior Furnishings and Design. Students choosing this area of emphasis should select 12 credits of electives from TMD 226, 326, 426, 440, and an additional 18 credits of professional electives3 from art and/or business.

Textile Science. Students selecting this area of concentration should take TMD 403 and 413 as well as additional chemistry, chemical engineering, and/or statistics courses. An internship in textile manufacturing is recommended. The 18 credits of professional electives3 should be selected from MTH 111, 131; PHY 111 and 112 or 213 and 214; STA 308 or 412 or CSC 201; CHM 112, 114, 212, 226, 227, or 228.

Students in this option are encouraged to broaden and deepen knowledge of textile science by enrolling for one or two semesters at another university through an exchange program. Through a special arrangement, URI students may study for a semester or year at the textile sciences department at the University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth, which has extensive textile manufacturing equipment and analytical instrumentation. Possible course work includes fiber science, yarn spinning, warp and weft knitting, jacquard or dobby weaving, composites, nonwovens, and manufacturing facilities design.

General TMD Program. Students may structure their own programs by concentrating course work in areas such as consumer studies, journalism, or gerontology. Selection of the 12 required TMD elective credits and the 18 professional elective credits3 should strengthen career goals and interests.

Art Minor. Students with an interest in apparel design or interior design should consider a minor in art. The requirements for this minor are determined by the Art Department and consist of 18 credits of any art or art history courses, 12 credits of which must be at the 200 level or above. The overall URI requirements for a minor apply (see Minor Fields of Study). Courses particularly appropriate to TMD can be determined by consultation with TMD and Art faculty.

Double Major in a “Fashion” Language. France and Italy lead the luxury fashion market. Students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science program in Textiles, Fashion Merchandising, and Design may earn a Bachelor of Arts in either French or Italian. Students must complete the requirements for both degrees. With careful planning, no extra semesters are required. TMD students who double major in a “fashion” language are strongly encouraged to participate in a study abroad experience and/or a professional internship in France or Italy. The Office of International Education and the respective departments help students arrange semester-long programs with affiliate universities. Students who graduate with majors in TMD and either French or Italian are well prepared to compete in the global fashion industry.

1 Admission to the degree-granting college in the major is a prerequisite for TMD 303.

2 Economics is a prerequisite for TMD 433.

3 Courses related to the student’s career goals, subject to approval by an advisor.


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