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2010-2011 Catalog Online

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English (ENG)

Chairperson: Associate Professor Trimm

110 Introduction to Literature (3)

Analysis of literature through reading and discussion of a number of genres derived from a variety of literary cultures. (Lec. 3) Not available for English major credit. (A) or (L) [D}

160 (or CLS 160) Literatures of the World (3)

Introduction to significant works of world literature. (Lec. 3) (A) or (L) [D]

201 Principles of Literary Study (3)

Introduction to the study of literature through reading and discussion of major methodologies, analytical approaches, and perspectives in literary study. Restricted to English majors. (Lec. 3)

202 Introduction to Literary Study (3)

Introduction to the study of literature and culture through written responses to and participation in a series of faculty presentations reflecting current critical and creative practices in the discipline. (Lec.3) Pre: 201. Restricted to English majors.

205 Creative Writing (3)

Writing and analysis of works written by class members and professional writers. 205A Poetry; 205B Fiction; 205C Nonfiction; 205D Screen Writing. In 205C, type of writing varies with instructor. (Lec. 3) 205A and 205B may be offered online. Students may repeat for a total of 12 credits but may not repeat the same letter.

245 Introduction to Film Decades (3)

Introduction to study of film in cultural context over an historical decade, e.g., Modernism and the Silent Era of the Twenties; Cinema of Wartime in the Forties; Vietnam, Nixon, and the Seventies Blockbuster. May be repeated once with a different emphasis. (Lec. 3)

241, 242 U.S. Literature I, II (3 each)

241: Selections from U.S. literature, beginnings to the mid-19th century. 242: Selections from U.S. literature, mid-19th century to the present. 241 not required for 242. (Lec. 3)

243 The Short Story (3)

Critical study of the short story from the early 19th century to the present (Lec. 3) (A) or (L) [D]

247 (or AAF 247) Introduction to Literature of the African Diaspora (3)

Major themes, genres, and motifs of the literatures of Africa and the Americas. Focus on one or more of these regions. Study of black oral and written literatures with emphasis on cultural, historical, political, and socioeconomic contexts. (Lec. 3) (A) [D]

248 (or AAF 248) African-American Literature from 1900 to the Present (3)

Twentieth-century African-American literature, with emphasis on major issues, movements, and trends, including the study of W.E.B. DuBois, the Harlem Renaissance, the civil rights movement, and the black arts movement. (Lec. 3) (A) [D]

251, 252 British Literature I, II (3 each)

251: Selections from British literature, beginnings to 1798. 252: Selections from British literature, 1798 to the present. (Lec. 3) 251 not required for 252.

260 Women and Literature (3)

Critical study of selected topics. (Lec. 3) (A) [D]

262 Introduction to Literary Genres: Non-fiction (3)

Introduction to the study of various types of non-fiction prose. (Lec. 3) (A) [D]

263 Introduction to Literary Genres: The Poem (3)

Introduction to the study of the poem. (Lec. 3) (A) [D] Professor Stein’s section is Writing Intensive [WI].

264 Introduction to Literary Genres: The Drama (3)

Introduction to the study of the drama. (Lec. 3) (A) [D]

265 Introduction to Literary Genres: The Novel (3)

Introduction to the study of the novel. (Lec. 3) (A) [D]

280 Introduction to Shakespeare (3)

Introduction to the major plays and poetry of Shakespeare. (Lec. 3) (A) or (L) [D]

300 Literature into Film (4)

Analysis of themes, techniques, printed and film narratives. 300A Drama; 300B Narrative. (Lec. 3, Lab 2)

302 Topics in Film Theory and Criticism (4)

Introduction to film theory and criticism. Emphasis on semiotics, auteur theory, psychoanalysis, genre studies, feminist theory, materialist critique, or cultural studies, with focus on range of popular, experimental, and documentary film traditions. May be repeated for credit when taken with different emphasis. (Lec. 3, Lab 2)

303 Cinematic Auteurs (4)

Literary study of one or more major directors with a substantial body of work exhibiting recurrent themes and distinctive style (e.g. Hitchcock, Kubrick, Kurasawa). Emphasis will vary. May be repeated once with different director. (Lec. 3, Lab 2)

304 Film Genres (4)

Literary study of the particular conventions and evolution of one or more film genres (e.g. romantic comedy, science fiction, western). Emphasis will vary. (Lec. 3, Lab 2) May be repeated once with a different genre.

305 Advanced Creative Writing (3)

Intensive writing and reading workshop for students at the advanced level who have preferably taken at least one previous class in creative writing. 305A Poetry; 305B Fiction; 305C Nonfiction; 305D Screen Writing. In 305C, type of writing varies with instructor. (Lec. 3/Online). 305A and B may be offered online. Students may repeat for a total of 12 credits but may not repeat the same letter.

317 Contemporary Women Novelists of the Americas

See Women’s Studies 317. (A) or (L) [D]

330 The Structure of American English (3)

Introduction to the phonology, morphology, and syntax of American English. Emphasis on skills needed to understand the prescriptive rules of grammarians and the descriptive rules of critics and teachers. (Lec. 3) (S)

332 The Evolution of the English Language (3)

History of English from a minor dialect of the North Sea to a major language of the Renaissance. Focus on the languages and cultures of Beowulf, Chaucer, and Shakespeare. (Lec. 3)

335 Interdisciplinary Studies in Comparative Literature

See Comparative Literature Studies 335.

336 The Language of Children’s Literature (3)

Introduction to stylistic analysis using children’s literature. Focus on sound patterns, word choice, and sentence structure to discuss appropriateness, interpretation, and evaluation. Emphasis on one writer or work. (Lec. 3)

337 Varieties of American English (3)

Study of regional and social dialects of American English. Emphasis on variations in pronunciation and word choice and on New England varieties. Includes independent or group field projects. Course contains language that may be offensive to some students. (Lec. 3)

338 Native American Literature (3)

Study of the literature of Native America. Considers early texts including mythology, legends, and traditions as well as contemporary works. (Lec. 3)

339 Literary Nonfiction (3)

Intensive study in one or more forms of nonfiction narrative (memoir, nature meditation, medical narrative, extended journalistic account, true crime, science narrative, historical account). (Lec. 3) May be repeated once for a total of 6 credits when taken with different emphasis.

345 Topics in American Colonial Literatures (3)

Studies in the literature and culture of the New World. Topics include discovery, exploration, early modern empire, settlement of the Americas. May include fictional and non-fictional prose, poetry, or dramatic works by major authors and their contemporaries. (Lec. 3) May be repeated once for a total of 6 credits, barring duplication of topics.

347 Antebellum U.S. Literature and Culture (3)

Study of pre-Civil War poetry and prose (the period formerly known as the American Renaissance/American Romantic movement). Readings may include Emerson, Douglass, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Fern, Whitman, and others. (Lec. 3)

348 U.S. Literature and Culture from 1865 to 1914 (3)

Study of post-Civil War poetry and prose. Readings may include Chesnutt, Chopin, Crane, DuBois, James, Twain, Wharton, and others. (Lec. 3)

350 Literary Theory and Criticism (3)

Introduction to theories of literature and their application in the analysis of selected texts. (Lec. 3) May be repeated for credit as often as topic changes.

351 History of Literary Theory and Criticism (3)

Intensive study of the problematization of representation in works selected from classical to contemporary thought. (Lec. 3)

352 Black Images in Film

See African and African-American Studies 352.

355 Literature and the Sciences (3)

Study of the representation of scientific themes in literature and/or the relationship between literature and the sciences. (Lec. 3) Pre: junior or senior standing. Enrollment priority given to students majoring in the sciences. (A) or (L) [D

356 Literature and the Law (3)

Study of the representation of legal themes in literature and/or the relationship between literature and the law. (Lec. 3) Pre: junior or senior standing. Enrollment priority given to students with career interests in law. (L) [D]

357 Literature and Medicine (3)

Study of the representation of medical themes in literature and/or the relationship between literature and medicine. (Lec. 3) Pre: junior or senior standing. Enrollment priority given to students with interest in medical careers. (A) [D]

358 Literature and Business (3)

Study of the representation of business themes in literature and/or the relationship between literature and business. (Lec. 3) Pre: junior or senior standing. Enrollment priority given to students majoring in business. (A) [D]

360 Africana Folk Life

See African and African American Studies 360.

362 (or AAF 362) African-American Literary Genres (Other than Short Story and Novel) (3)

Study of drama and poetry in the continued oral and written heritage of Africa and America. Focus on Baraka, Bullins, Dunbar, Giovanni, Hughes, and Walker. (Lec. 3)

363 (or AAF 363) African-American Fiction (3)

Study of formal and thematic developments in the African-American novel and short story. Focus on Baldwin, Chesnutt, Ellison, Gaines, Hurston, Jacobs, Marshall, Morrison, Naylor, Reed, Walker, Wideman, Wilson, and Wright. (Lec. 3)

364 (or AAF 364) Contemporary African Literature (3)

Study of contemporary African literature by genre, region, or theme, with emphasis on literary traditions, issues, and socio-cultural contexts. (Lec. 3)

366 Greek and Roman Drama (3)

Survey of Greek and Roman drama with special emphasis on art and achievement of major dramatists: Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Plautus, Terence, and Seneca. (Lec. 3)

367 The Epic (3)

Studies in epic literature from Homer to the modern period. Historical emphasis will vary with instructor. (Lec. 3)

368 The Bible (3)

Introduction to poetry and narrative in the Old Testament and the Apocrypha, primarily in the Authorized (King James) Version. (Lec. 3)

373 British Literature of the Renaissance (3)

Study of the works of major Renaissance writers such as Wyatt, Sidney, Daniel, Spenser, Marlowe, Hobbes, and others. (Lec. 3)

374 British Literature: 1660-1800 (3)

Study of major trends in late 17th- and 18th-century verse, prose, drama, and fiction by such writers as Dryden, Behn, Congreve, Pope, Swift, and Johnson. (Lec. 3)

376 Topics in Victorian Literature and Culture (3)

Notable literary and cultural movements and motifs of the Victorian era. May include prose, poetry, or dramatic works by major authors and their contemporaries. May be repeated once with a different topic. (Lec. 3)

377 Topics in Romanticism (3)

Notable literary and cultural movements and motifs of Romantic literature and culture. May include prose, poetry, or dramatic works by major Romantic authors and their contemporaries. May be repeated once with a different topic. (Lec. 3)

378 Aspects of Postmodernism (3)

Introduction to major issues and theories of postmodern literature and culture. Emphases may include temporality, borders, cyberculture, theories of the image, and constructions of subjectivity. (Lec. 3).

379 Contemporary Literature (3)

Studies in contemporary literature with an emphasis on cultural and interdisciplinary issues. Movements and emphases may include multiculturalism, culture and technology, globalization, and politics of the body. (Lec. 3)

381 Topics in Medieval Literature (3)

Emphasis on cultural and interdisciplinary issues. (Lec. 3) May be repeated once with a different topic.

382 Topics in Renaissance Literature (3)

Emphasis on cultural and interdisciplinary issues. (Lec. 3) May be repeated once with a different topic.

383 Modernist Literature, 1900-1945 (3)

Poetry, drama, fiction, and/or nonfiction prose with an emphasis on writers such as Eliot, Faulkner, Hurston, Joyce, Stevens, Yeats, Woolf, and Wright. (Lec. 3)

385 Women Writers (3)

Analysis of the poetry, drama, or fiction of women writers. Emphasis on 19th-century, 20th-century, or contemporary authors. Course may be repeated for credit when taken with different emphasis. (Lec. 3)

387 Foundational Texts in Modern Gay and Lesbian Culture (3)

Study of literary works that trace the origins and ongoing definitions of modern homo/heterosexual identities. Selections from writers such as Whitman, Wilde, Proust, Woolf, Lawrence, Gide, Mann, Cather, and Baldwin. (Lec. 3)

394, 395 Independent Study (1-3 each)

Extensive individual study and research, culminating in a substantial essay. (Independent Study) Pre: permission of chairperson. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

396 Literature of the Sea: The Rumowicz Seminar (3)

Poetry and prose of the sea. Guest lecturers and field trips. (Lec. 3)

397 The Literary Landscape of Britain (3)

Taught in England, second summer session. Examines impact of English social and natural landscapes on, and their treatment in, selected literary works. (Lec. 3) Usually taught in conjunction with HIS 397.

399 Special Topics in Literature (3)

Specialized topics in the study of literature offered by specialists in the field. (Lec. 3)

432 Cultural History of the English Language (3)

Studies in the history of the English language with a focus on cultural and social context. Attention to the relation between linguistic change and the role of language in cultural and political events. (Lec. 3)

446 Modern Drama (3)

Studies in major works by modern playwrights. (Lec. 3)

447 Modern Poetry (3)

Study of major contributions and movements in poetry from 1900 to the present. (Lec. 3)

448 Traditions of the Novel in the Americas (3)

Studies in the North, South, and/or Central American novel. (Lec. 3)

451 Advanced Topics in International Film Media

See Film Media 451.

469 The Modern Novel (3)

Studies in the novel from 1900 to the present. (Lec. 3)

472 Shakespeare (3)

Studies in Shakespeare’s drama and poetry. (Lec. 3)

478 Medieval Authors (3)

Studies in works by one or more major medieval authors. May be repeated once, barring duplication of writers. (Seminar 3)

479 Renaissance Authors (3)

Studies in works by one or more major Renaissance authors (excepting Shakespeare). May be repeated once, barring duplication of writers. (Seminar 3)

480 British Restoration and Enlightenment Authors (3)

Studies in works by one or two major Restoration and Enlightenment authors. (Lec. 3) May be repeated once for a total of 6 credits, barring duplication of writers.

482 American Enlightenment Authors (3)

Studies in works by one or two major Enlightenment authors. (Lec. 3) May be repeated once for a total of 6 credits, barring duplication of writers.

485 U.S. Authors (3)

Studies in works by one or two major United States authors. (Lec. 3) May be repeated once for a total of 6 credits, barring duplication of writers.

486 British Authors (3)

Studies in works by one or two major British authors. (Lec. 3) May be repeated once for a total of 6 credits, barring duplication of writers.

487 World Authors (3)

Studies in works by one or two major world authors (excepting U.S. or British authors). (Lec. 3) May be repeated once for a total of 6 credits, barring duplication of writers.

489 Literature and Empire (3)

Studies of specific authors, literary movements, or comparative themes in texts reflecting the impact of colonization and imperialism. (Lec. 3) Pre: junior or senior standing.

493, 494 Internship in English (3)

Exploration of career goals and job opportunities. Participate in a variety of work situations, supervised by both faculty member and on-site personnel. 120 hours per 3 credits, weekly one-hour class meeting. (Practicum) Pre: 18 credits in English and permission of chairperson. May be taken for a total of 6 credits, only 3 of which may be used as credit toward the English major. Not for graduate credit. S/U only.

499 Senior Seminar (3)

Critically investigates selected topics pertinent to the field. (Seminar) Open only to junior and senior English majors. May be taken once. Not for graduate credit.

All 500-level courses require graduate standing in a degree program or permission of instructor. All courses except ENG 510 and 511 may be repeated once if emphasis changes.

501 Workshop in Creative Writing (3)

Close supervision and discussion of creative writing, including poetry, nonfiction, short prose forms, scripts, and novels. (Lec. 3)

510 Introduction to Professional Study I (1.5)

Orientation to the major discourses, critical frameworks, and databases constituting graduate research in language and literary studies, including computer-assisted research methodologies. (Seminar). S/U only.

511 Introduction to Professional Study II (1.5)

Orientation to the major discourses, critical frameworks, and databases constituting graduate research in language and literary studies, including computer-assisted research methodologies. (Seminar). Pre: 510. S/U only.

514 Studies in Critical Theories (3)

Introduction to historical or contemporary studies in critical theory; e.g. modernity and postmodernity, aesthetics, politics, interpretative traditions, audiences. May explore semiotic, psychoanalytic, materialist, feminist, postcolonial, and cultural theories. (Lec. 3)

535 Old English (3)

Introduction to the language and literature. (Lec. 3)

540 Studies in American Texts Before 1815 (3)

Cultural texts and topics of the Western Hemisphere before 1815: literary and nonliterary writings and genres; exploration and captivity narrative; African transmissions; critical theory; culture, gender, race, and class. (Lec. 3)

543 Studies in 19th-Century American Texts (3)

Literary and nonliterary cultural texts, genres, and topics of the Western Hemisphere. May include media; oral, industrial, and popular cultures; critical theory and the analysis of discourses; issues of class, gender, and race. (Lec. 3)

545 Studies in American Texts After 1900 (3)

Modern, contemporary, and postmodern cultural texts, genres, and topics of the Western Hemisphere; e.g. literary and nonliterary writings, performance modes, media, theory, and cultural studies of race, genre, and class. (Lec. 3)

550 Studies in British Texts Before 1700 (3)

Literary and nonliterary cultural texts and genres of the medieval, Renaissance, and Restoration periods. May include oral and written forms; the roles of audience, gender, class, and other social relations. (Lec. 3)

553 Studies in British Texts 1700-1832 (3)

Literary and nonliterary cultural texts and genres during the Restoration, Augustan, Enlightenment, and Romantic periods; e.g., drama, media, rhetoric, theory, and discourse analysis of gender, class, race, and other social relations. (Lec. 3)

555 Studies in 19th-Century British Texts (3)

Literary and cultural texts and genres during the 19th century. May include drama and other performance modes; critical theory and the analysis of discourses; representations of class, gender, and race. (Lec. 3)

557 Studies in British Texts After 1900 (3)

Modern, contemporary, and postmodern cultural texts; e.g., literary and nonliterary writings, drama, colonial and European cultural relations, film, theory, and cultural studies of institutional life and other social relations. (Lec. 3)

560 Studies in European Texts (3)

Introduction to the study of European texts in translation. May include different historical periods; literary and nonliterary writings; theory; film; rhetoric; and issues of culture, gender, race, class, and sexuality. (Lec. 3)

570 Studies in Postcolonial Texts (3)

Investigation of similarities and differences between nonoccidental and occidental genres; traditions and practices of postcolonial oral, written, and visual cultural forms from Africa, Australia, New Zealand, the Americas, India, Ireland, and Scotland. (Lec. 3)

590 Selected Topics (1-3)

Selected topics in American and British literature and topics of special interest not covered by traditional department offerings. (Lec. 1-3)

595 Master’s Project (1-6)

Number of credits to be determined each semester in consultation with the major professor or director of graduate studies. S/U only.

599 Master’s Thesis Research

Number of credits is determined each semester in consultation with the major professor or program committee. (Independent Study) S/U credit.

All 600-level (seminar) courses require graduate standing in a degree program or permission of instructor. Courses include specialized topics, intensive readings, occasional lectures, and frequent presentation of ongoing research by students. A substantial research project is required. May be repeated once if emphasis changes.

601 Seminar in Creative Writing (3)

Seminar for advanced students under supervision of a member arranged to suit individual project requirements of students. (Seminar)

605 Seminar in Genres (3)

In-depth study of a single or several genres and/or subgenres, such as epic, drama, or horror film. (Seminar)

610 Seminar in Historical Periods (3)

Selected topics of relevance for historical periods. Periods emphasized are medieval, 16th- and 17th-century British, 18th- and 19th-century British, North American, and postcolonial. (Seminar)

615 Seminar in Authors (3)

In-depth and critical study of selected works of one or two authors from any historical period, genre, or medium; theories and traditions of authorship; authorship and gender. (Seminar)

620 Seminar in Culture and Discourse (3)

Contrasting theoretical conceptions of culture, discursive practices, hegemony, the public and private spheres, and related concerns; may cross any historical formation or period. (Seminar)

625 Seminar in Media (3)

Critical and theoretical conceptions of one or more media across any historical formation or period. (Seminar)

630 Seminar in Canons (3)

Critical and theoretical conceptions of canons and canonicity, including emerging or revisionist canons. (Seminar)

635 Seminar in Subjectivities (3)

Critically investigates class, race, gender, sexuality, and/or other subject positions as they are constructed by literary or other media. Might emphasize reading and writing communities, form and ideology, or identity politics. (Seminar)

650 Seminar in Critical Theory (3)

In-depth study of one or several critical theories such as psychoanalytic, feminist, postcolonial, and cultural studies. (Seminar)

660 Seminar in Special Topics (3)

Topics of special interest not covered by other offerings. (Seminar)

690 Independent Graduate Study (1-6)

Number of credits is determined each semester in consultation with the major professor, director of graduate studies, and chairperson.

691, 692 Independent Graduate Study (3 each)

Advanced study of an approved topic under the supervision of a faculty member. (Independent Study)

699 Doctoral Dissertation Research

Number of credits is determined each semester in consultation with the major professor or program committee. (Independent Study) S/U credit.

999 Methods of Teaching Literature (0)

Materials and various methods of teaching literature on the college level. Required of teaching assistants who will teach English department literature courses as part of their TA assignment. (Seminar) Pre: graduate standing.


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