Sustainable Landscaping
healthy lawn care
rain gardens

 

 

David and Deirdre (URI Master Gardener) Wrenn, Wickford, RI

What you will see!

Area 2: Shade bed -- sustainable plants -- this page

Existing conditions & sustainable plantings

2004 photo gallery

2005 photo gallery


Area 1: Coastal bank -- sustainable plants

Area 3: Roof runoff control

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Area 2: Shade bed -- sustainable plants -- this page
Tip 1 - choose the right plants
Tip 6 - reduce soil erosion

Existing conditions:

The presence of large, native trees in the yard creates shaded conditions. A shallow drain field, which is part of an enhanced treatment septic system installed as part of a demonstration project in 1997 lies west of the front porch.

This area must remain in lawn grass to protect the integrity of the shallow drain operation and design. Areas outside of the shallow drain field are difficult to manage due to contours created by the local street (a small dirt road) and shaded conditions.

Goal: The plan for this location is to create a contoured, mulched shade garden, incorporating the edge of Loop Drive and an existing native tree, to be planted with shade tolerant shrubs, groundcovers, and other perennial plants. The design will allow for future placement of steppingstones and a larger stone or boulder.


September 10, 2003 -- establishing the bed area


September 10, 2003 -- establishing the bed area


September 10, 2003 -- a Wisteria plant (to the right of the lilac bush straight ahead) will be transplanted to another more suitable location in the backyard.

Sustainable plantings: September 22, 2003

Plant list includes: Sweet Pepperbush (Clethra alnifolia); Redvein Enkianthus (Enkianthus campanulatus); Mountain Laurel (Kalmia latifolia); Blue Lacecap Hydrangea (Hydrangea macrohpylla); Inkberry (Ilex glabra); Winterberry (Ilex verticillata); Leucothoe; Double File Viburnum (Viburnum plicatun); Ginger (Asarum); Yellow Coreopsis; Blue Salvia; and Pink Sedum.

The URI 101 class of students learn about sustainable landscaping practices and techniques from Dr. Richard Casagrande, URI Plant Science Department.




10 cubic yards of loam was used to provide for a mounded area and to correct uneven grades along the existing retaining wall.

Plants selected and placed by Patricia Mullens, URI Landscape Architecture Program.

The existing lawn was treated with roundup about two weeks before this installation. Plants were planted directly into the dead sod and mulched.

Spreading mulch.

The Wisteria plant was removed and transplanted to a more suitable location in the back yard. The area was filled with topsoil, seeded and mulched (the bluish-green patch beyond the lilac bush).

October 2003

October 2003

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2004 Photo Gallery


May 2004, Ilex Helleri, dwarf Japanese Black Holly is planted to fill in bed areas.

Hostas from on-site were transplanted during Fall 2003 installation, May 2004.

May 2004, sedum, blue salvia, ginger.

July 2004

July 2004

July 2004

July 2004

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2005 Photo Gallery

Mountain Laurel in bloom, June 17, 2005.

Mountain Laurel in bloom, June 17, 2005.

Salvia in bloom, July 6, 2005.


Blue Lacecap Hydrangea in bloom, July 6, 2005.


Blue Lacecap Hydrange, July 6, 2005.


Area 1: Coastal bank -- sustainable plants

Area 3: Roof runoff control

Back to demonstration sites

Special thanks to Patricia Mullins, URI Landscape Architecture Program, for dedicating much thought and time to the site design and plant selection.

Special thanks to Dr. Richard Casagrande and Dr. Brian Maynard (URI Plant Science Department); URI Master Gardeners Rudi Hempe, Vicky Wilson, Linda Hughes, and Joy Gerstenblatt; and the URI 101 class of students for their time, expertise, and assistance with planning, implementation and maintenance.

Special thanks to Dr. Sue Gordon and the Kinney Azaelea Gardens for a generous plant donation.