URIWW Home

Online Data Entry

Program Contacts

Program Information

Monitoring Overview

What's Monitored

Becoming a Citizen Scientist

Volunteer Training

Monitoring Schedules and Data Sheets for printing

Current Monitoring Sites - Including Station #
- Lakes, Ponds & Reservoirs
- Rivers & streams

- Bays, salt ponds & harbors

Link to Bathymetric Maps of Some RI Ponds

Participating Communities

Program Partners

Monitoring Manuals

Monitoring Data and Results

Water Quality Factsheets

Research Connections

Aquatic Invasive Species

Cyanobacteria (Algal Blooms)

Success Stories

Additional Resources
- Science Fair -
Water Projects
- Volunteer Monitoring
- Educational
- Water Facts
- Agencies (Including URI)
- Organizations

Facebook

Lots that each of us can do to protect our local resourses!

(click here for upcoming events and more information)

Getting Involved - Becoming a Citizen Scientist

Volunteer environmental monitoring can be a great family activity, a good excuse to get out on the water, or simply a good way to learn about pollution of water, and how to protect your favorite waterbody. Our volunteers come from diverse educational backgrounds and experiences, with some holding advanced degrees in science, and others still in high school. No previous education or training is required order to participate, simply a way to get to your monitoring site, and a desire to help out, and get a little wet. URI Watershed Watch provides all the training (classroom and field), equipment and laboratory analyses.

For lake, pond, and reservoir sites: Boats are needed for monitoring these sites (potential sites). Volunteers must provide their own boats, personal flotation devices and have completed an approved boating safety course in order to monitor these sites. Because the measurement of water clarity, a critical element of lake monitoring, is heavily influenced by the height of the sun, monitoring at these sites takes place mid-day, when the sun is at it's highest from 10:00 AM until 2:00 PM, on a weekly basis on the day of your choice. Then at least three times a season according to a schedule established by URI Watershed Watch, samples will be collected between and immediately brought to the URI Watershed Watch laboratory in Kingston for analysis of parameters that can not be done in the field.

Salt pond, harbor and bay sites: Boats are needed for monitoring many of these sites (potential sites). Volunteers must provide their own boats, personal flotation devices and have completed an approved boating safety course in order to monitor these sites. Dockside sites ARE available for all the Bristol Harbor, and many pf the salt ponds and Greenwich Bay sites, for those without access to a boat. The shoreside sites may be located at commercial marinas or other public / private access points, and thus may require signing an additional liability waiver to protect the property owner. Monitoring at these sites is done first thing in the morning - preferrably before 9:00 AM - on a weekly basis on the day of your choice. Once a month according to a schedule established by URI Watershed Watch, samples will be collected between 6:00 and 9:00 AM, and immediately brought to the URI Watershed Watch laboratory in Kingston for analysis of parameters that can not be done in the field.

River (including Narrow River) and stream sites: Most of our river and stream sites (potential sites) are quite shallow, and monitored from shoreside or within the stream (waders or other water gear is recommended). Boats are needed for a few Narrow River sites, and volunteers must provide their own boats, personal flotation devices and have completed an approved boating safety course in order to monitor these sites. Monitoring at river sites takes place first thing in the morning - preferrably before 9:00 AM - every other week (bi-weekly) on the day of your choice. Once a month according to a schedule established by URI Watershed Watch, samples will be collected between 6:00 and 9:00 AM, and immediately brought to the URI Watershed Watch laboratory in Kingston for analysis of parameters that can not be done in the field.

Whenever possible, we try to recruit 'teams' of volunteers to monitor each site. Sharing a set of monitoring equipment, these teams can either work together, alternate weekly or monthly monitoring, or just have a back-up for vacations, or other scheduling conflicts. Mostly we hope to provide citizens with an opportunity to learn about a much appreciated local resource, about the science of water quality monitoring, and what it all means!

Click here to become a URI Watershed Watch volunteer monitor!

 Questions, comments, or problems with the website? Email our Webmaster. Last updated 8/27/2014.
URI Watershed Watch provides equal program opportunities without regard to race,age, sex or preference, creed, or disability. The University is an Affirmative Action / Equal Opportunity employer. AES and CE programs are nondiscriminatory (Non-Discrimination Statement). Copyright 2006 URI Water Quality Program