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Interdisciplinary Neuroscience Program

Neuroscience

M.S., Ph.D.
401.874.4233, uri.edu/gsadmis/inp

The Interdisciplinary Neuroscience Program involves faculty from the departments of Biological Sciences; Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences; Chemistry; Cell and Molecular Biology; Communicative Disorders; Electrical, Biomedical, and Computer Engineering; Mechanical, Industrial, and Systems Engineering; Psychology; and Physical Therapy. It is administered by the Graduate School and an executive committee appointed by the dean of each participating college.

Executive Committee: Professor Zawia, chair, Professors Gabriele Kass-Simon, Lisa Weyandt, Associate Professor Besio, Assistant Professors Mahler and Worthen, Adjunct Professor Mosley Austin. Faculty: Professors Faghri, Hufnagel, Kass-Simon, Kay, Kumaresan, Ohley, Parang, Sun, Webb, Weyandt, Willis, and Zawia; Associate Professors Agostinucci, Besio, DeBoef, Goren, Kim, Kovoor, Mahler, Martin, Seeram, and Sun; Assistant Professors He and Worthen; Adjunct Professors Anagnostopoulos, DiCecco, and Mosley Austin.

Faculty: Professors Faghri, Hufnagel, Kass-Simon, Kay, Kumaresan, Ohley, Sun, Webb, Weyandt, Willis, and Zawia; Associate Professors Agostinucci, Besio, DeBoef, Goren, Kim, Martin, Sun, and Vetter; Assistant Professors He, Huang, Kovoor, Mahler, Worthen; Adjunct Professors DiCecco and Mosley Austin.

Specializations

Dementia and aging; central nervous system disorders; vertebrate and invertebrate cellular, molecular, and behavioral neurobiology imaging; and neural engineering.

Master of Science

Admission requirements: GRE general test, a bachelor's degree in the sciences (or related disciplines), two letters of recommendation, a statement of purpose, and transcripts of all previous degrees are required. Applicants are encouraged to specify in their statement of purpose one or more faculty members with whom they are interested in working, and to explain why. Students with deficiencies in undergraduate courses relevant to their Program of Study may be required to take additional courses without program credit.

In general, students will be admitted if they meet the minimum GRE requirements (a combined verbal and quantitative score of 300 in the new system and 1,100 in the old system), a minimum GPA of 3.00, good letters of recommendation, and an acceptable statement of purpose. In exceptional circumstances, the student who falls short may still be considered for admission with further evaluation.

Program requirements: The program requires a minimum of 30 credits: 18-20 in coursework, 6-9 in research, and 1-6 in electives. Required courses include: NEU 502, 503, 504, PSY 532, as well as at least one credit NEU 581/582. Two semesters of NEU 591 are required, one in the students primary area of research, and one in a related discipline. Two semesters of journal club (NEU 587 or equivalent), a thesis proposal and successful defense of thesis are required.

Doctor of Philosophy

Admission requirements: Same as for Master's degree.

Program requirements: Successful completion of a qualifying examination or an earned M.S. with thesis in an appropriate discipline, a comprehensive examination, and dissertation defense. As the qualifying exam is meant to be equivalent to the M.S. degree, the examination must be taken no later than the first semester following the completion of eighteen credits of coursework. This examination is intended to assess a student's potential to perform satisfactorily at the doctoral level. A minimum of 72 credits is required, 18 to 28 of which may be earned through dissertation research (NEU 699). Up to 30 transfer credits will be accepted for students who have already earned an M.S. degree. Registration in NEU 581 and 582 is required for one year, and successful completion of NEU 502, 503, and 504 are required. PSY 532 (or equivalent) and one additional statistics or computational analysis course (e.g. STA 500, 502, 541, or 545) are required. Two semesters of NEU 591 are required, one in the students primary area of research, and one in a related discipline. Depending on a student's previous training and experience, certain requirements may be waived at the discretion of the student's dissertation committee and the Graduate School. In the final semester, a formal presentation of thesis research is required in 581/582.

Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Neuroscience

A student who does not seek a neuroscience degree, but instead wants official recognition that he/she has specific training and instruction in neuroscience, can receive a Certificate in the Neurosciences.

Admission requirements: A bachelor's degree in any field with a 3.00 GPA or higher. Students already enrolled in a master's or doctoral degree at URI are eligible to apply. Students not in a graduate degree program may also apply.

Program requirements: Students will be required to successfully complete 12 credits of neuroscience coursework including NEU 503.

Courses

Required Courses

NEU 503: Introduction to the Neurosciences I (4)- Introduction to basic neuroscience areas, including gross and microscopic anatomy, neural development, membrane physiology, sensory and motor systems, language, cognition, neuropharmacology, neuroengineering, and psychological disorders. (Lec 3; Rec 1) Pre: permission of instructor.

NEU 502 (BIO 502): Neurosciences II (3 cr) Fundamental processes in neurobiology with emphasis on cellular and membrane mechanisms of nerve functioning. (Lec 3). Pre: BIO 201 and MTH 141, or permission of instructor.

NEU 504: Neuroethics (1cr) Neuroethics is the study of ethical issues regarding research in neuroscience. Students will learn the implications of neuroscience research for human self-understanding, ethics and policy.

PSY 532: Experimental Design (3 cr) Application of statistical methods to biological and psychological research and experimentation. Experimental situations for which various ANOVA and ANCOVA designs are most suitable. (Lec. 3) Pre: STA 409 or equivalent.

NEU 581/2: Colloquium (1 cr) Program of invited speakers, who will present original research topics in neurosciences field. Credit available to graduate students in the Interdisciplinary Neurosciences Program (INP) and graduate students and upper level undergraduates from other programs. (Seminar)
Journal club/seminar approved by the student's committee

NEU 591 Special Projects in Neuroscience Laboratory in student's primary area of research (3-4 cr, dependent on instructor and course)

NEU 591 Special Projects in Neuroscience Laboratory in related discipline (3-4 cr, dependent on instructor and course)

NEU 599: Master's Thesis Research (Number of credits is determined each semester in consultation with the student's major professor).

NEU 699: Doctoral Dissertation Research (Number of credits is determined each semester in consultation with the student's major professor)

Elective courses currently listed in the URI catalog

BPS 436, PSY 436: Psychotropic Drugs and Therapy (3)- Interaction of drug and nondrug therapy and of physiological and psychological origins of psychopathology. Intended for advanced undergraduate and graduate students interested in clinical psychology. (Lec. 3) Pre: any one of the following-BIO 101, 104B, 113, 121, PSY 381, or permission of instructor.

BPS 555 Protein Molecular Modeling (3)- Use of cutting edge computer software to study the 3D-structure of proteins of biomedical interest. Independent application of course topics will be required in the form of a research project to create new knowledge. (Lec. 2, Rec. 1) Pre: at least one course in biochemistry and one course in organic chemistry.

BIO 445: Endocrinology I (3)- Comparative approach to the endocrine regulation of the organism and to the molecular basis for hormone action. (Lec. 3) Pre: BCH 311 or equivalent and BIO 201 or 242 or equivalent. Taught in alternate years.

BIO 467: Animal Behavior (3)- Ethology and sociobiology of animals. Topics in the control and development of behavior patterns, orientation in time and space, social behavior, and behavioral ecology. (Lec. 3) Pre: two semesters of Biology.

BIO 546: Introduction to Neurobiology (3)- Fundamental processes in neurobiology with emphasis on cellular and membrane mechanisms of nerve functioning. (Lec. 3) Pre: BIO 201 and MTH 141 or permission of instructor. In alternate years.

BIO 587: Seminar in Neurobiology (1)- Survey of current literature in the neurosciences. Topics include molecular and behavioral electrophysiology, ion channels, nerve net modelling, ultrastructure of excitable cells, receptor and pharmacological neurobiology of invertebrates and vertebrates. (Seminar) Pre: graduate standing or one advanced neuroscience course.

MIC 521: Recent Advances in Cell and Molecular Biology (2)- Reading and discussion of current literature (original research papers and review articles) in the area of molecular cell biology, and presentation of oral reports. Final written report or exam. Emphasis on eukaryotic cells. (Lec. 2) Pre: At least one of the following courses or an equivalent course emphasizing cell structure and function -- MIC 453, BCH 437, 453, 481, BIO 437, 453, or permission of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits.

PHT 511: Human Neuroscience and Neurology (5)- Anatomy, physiology, dysfunction, and evaluation of the human nervous system as a basis of therapeutic intervention. Gross and microscopic structure of the nervous system and the neurological examination (Lec. 4, Lab. 2) **Pre: second-year standing in D.P.T. or permission of chairperson.

BIO 545: Endocrinology II (3)- Integration of cell and molecular processes with whole animal function. Hormones and their regulation, of early development, growth, metabolism, salt and water balance, adaptation to stress, reproduction, and behavior. (Lec. 3) Pre: graduate standing or permission of the instructor.

ELE 561: Physiological Modeling and Control (3)- Principles of physiological modeling and control of linear and nonlinear systems, stability analysis, root locus, Bode plots, linearization. (Lec. 3) Pre: ELE 314.

BME 568: Neural Engineering (3)- Principles and technologies of neuroengineering and clinical applications; brain stimulator, spinal cord stimulation, functional electrical stimulation (FES), neural-machine interface for motor prosthesis control, artificial visual/auditory devices for augmented sensory perception. (Lec. 3) Pre: 360.

BPS 572: Neural Bases of Drug Action (3)- Review of neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and neurophysiology as they relate to drug action. (Lec. 3) Pre: BPS 446 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Offered every third year.

PSY 434 Psychological Testing (3)- Measurement procedures employed in the measurement of intelligence, aptitudes, abilities, attitudes, interests, and personality. Focus on psychometric principles associated with the various tests. (Lec. 3) Pre: PSY 200 or equivalent.

PSY 601: Physiological Psychology (3)- An advanced consideration of physiological research on neural, endocrine, and response systems as they relate to attention, motivation, emotion, memory, and psychological disorders. (Lec. 2)

PSY 604: Cognitive Psychology (3)- A survey of the theoretical and methodological issues in human cognition. Topics include pattern recognition, attention, memory, language, problem solving (Lec. 3)

PSY 607: Advanced Psychopathology (3)- A review of the multicultural, theoretical, clinical, and empirical literature related to the development, classification, and diagnosis of psychopathology. (Lec. 3)

BPS 525: Experimental Techniques in Biomedical Sciences: (4 crs.) Provides experience with a variety of techniques used in biomedical science research, including HPLC, NMR, polarimetry, biotransformations, solid-phase synthesis, cell fractionation, and isolation and purification of proteins. (Lab. 4)

BPS 542: Bioinformatics I: (3-4 crs.) Integrates computing, statistical, and biological sciences, algorithms, and data analysis/management. Multidisciplinary student research teams. Modeling dynamic biological processes. Extra project work for 4 credits. (Lec. 3, Project 3) Pre: major in a computing, statistical, or biological science or permission of instructor.

BPS 546: Advanced Toxicology: (3 crs.) Toxic effects of selected drugs and other xenobiotics on physiological and biochemical processes. (Lec. 3) Pre: permission of instructor. Offered every third year.

BCH 581: General Biochemistry I (3 crs.) First semester of a two-semester course on the principles of biochemistry. Topics include: bioenergetics, protein structure, enzymology, glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation. (Lec. 3) Pre: CHM 228 and 229.

BCH 582: General Biochemistry II (3 crs.) Second semester of a two-semester course on the principles of biochemistry. Topics include: photosynthesis, membranes, hormones, metabolism, the biosynthesis of DNA, RNA, and proteins. (Lec. 3) Pre: 581 or permission of instructor.

BCH 642: Biochemical Toxicology (3 crs.) Biochemical and molecular aspects of chemically induced cell injury and chemical carcinogenesis. (Lec. 3) Pre: permission of instructor. Offered every third year.

BIO 521: Recent Advances in Cell and Molecular Biology (2 crs.) Reading and discussion of current literature (original research papers and review articles) in the area of molecular cell biology, and presentation of oral reports. Final written report or exam. Emphasis on eukaryotic cells. (Lec. 2) Pre: At least one of the following courses or an equivalent course emphasizing cell structure and function -- MIC 453, BCH 437, 453, 481, BIO 437, 453, or permission of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits.

BIO 545: Endocrinology II :(3 crs.) Integration of cellular processes with whole animal challenges of early development, growth, metabolism, salt and water balance, adaptation to stress, reproduction, and behavior. (Lec. 3) Pre: graduate standing

BIO 550: Advanced Topics In Neurobiology: (3 crs.) Published papers in selected aspects of neurobiology will be discussed. Representative topics include role of Ca++, c-AMP in the nervous system, gating currents learning at the cellular level, cellular rhythmicity. (Seminar) In alternate years.

BIO 553: Regulatory Processes in Eucaryotic Cells: (3 crs.) Regulation of eucaryotic cell biology by processes governing organization and function, including transport, protein sorting, signal transduction, gene expression, and changes in the cytoskeleton. Focus on GTP-binding proteins and protein kinases. (Lec. 3) Pre: BCH 311 or graduate standing.

CHE 548: Separations For Biotechnology: (3 crs.) A study of methods of concentration used in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries for production and isolation of products. (Lec. 3) Pre: CHE 348 or CHE 447. In alternate years.

CHE 550: Bionanotechnology: (3 crs.) Principles and applications of bionanotechnology. Intermolecular forces, self-assembly, biomolecular structure, biological processes, molecular manufacturing, and surface functionalization for designing biodevices and nanomaterials. Overview of current and emerging technologies, safety and ethics. (Lec. 3) Pre: graduate standing or permission of instructor.

CHE 574: Biochemical Engineering I: (3 crs.) Application of chemical engineering principles to topics in bioprocessing and biotechnology, such as enzyme and cell-growth kinetics, enzyme and cell immobilization, bioreactors, medium sterilization. (Lec. 3) Pre: permission of instructor.

CHM 519: Theoretical Concepts in NMR: (3 crs.) The physical concepts of NMR phenomena are presented, beginning with signals generated in the probe, carried through the spectrometer console, into the computer, and finally represented as a spectrum. (Lec. 3) Pre: CHM 292, PHY 112, and MTH 141, or equivalents, or permission of instructor.

CHM 520: Interpretation of One-Dimensional and Two-Dimensional NMR Spectra: (3 crs.) Uses of chemical shifts and coupling constants are presented for interpreting one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) proton and carbon spectra. Includes relaxation time measurements, decoupling, and simple 2D interpretation. (Lec. 3) Pre: CHM 292, PHY 112, and MTH 141, or equivalents, or CHM 519 or permission of instructor.

CHM 618: Theory of Separations: (3 crs.) In-depth presentation of theory of separation processes. Emphasis on methods development, advanced topics, and current advances using gas and liquid chromatography. (Lec. 3) Pre: CHM 511 or permission of instructor.

CMD 504: Research in Communicative Disorders: (3 crs.) Types of research in speech pathology, audiology, and communication science; critiques of representative models with special emphasis on experimental research; individual pilot projects or master's thesis. (Lec. 3) Pre: 372, 373, 374, 375, graduate standing, or permission of instructor.

CMD 550: Audiology for Speech-Language Pathologists A,B,C: (1-3 crs.) Introduction to audiology for the speech-language pathology graduate student. Hearing disorders, hearing assessment, child and adult aural rehabilitation. Modular format with variable credits. (Lec. 1-3) Offered once per year.

CMD 551: Measurement of Hearing I: (4 crs.) Diagnostic protocols for routine audiologic assessment including pure tone, speech, and immittance procedures. Discussion of etiology and symptomatology of hearing disorders. (Lec. 4) Pre: CMD 372, 373, 374, 375, and 376; graduate standing or permission of instructor.

CMD 553: Pediatric Audiology: (3 crs.) Theoretical and methodological approaches to the identification and management of children with auditory disorders. Topics discussed include auditory development, audiometric evaluation, and hearing aids. (Lec. 3) Pre: CMD 551 or permission of instructor. In alternate years.

CMD 554: Advanced Rehabilitative Processes for Hearing Impaired: (3 crs.) Advanced techniques and technology in aural rehabilitation including family-based management, multidiscipline approaches and complex assistive devices. (Lec. 3) Pre: CMD 454 and CMD 551. Offered Spring.

CMD 556: Hearing Aids: (3 crs.) Application of technological and behavioral strategies in fitting hearing aids, including aid selection and delivery, counseling, assessment of wearer performance, marketing, and legal issues. (Lec. 3) Pre: CMD 555. In alternate years.

CMD 557: Electrophysiological Measures In Audiology: (4 crs.) Basic electrophysiological assessment procedures and instrumentation. Otoacoustic emissions, electrocochleography, auditory brainstem response, and middle, late, and steady-state auditory evoked potentials. (Lec. 4) Pre: CMD 551 or permission of instructor. In alternate years.

CMD 560: Voice Disorders: (3 crs.) Etiology and symptomology of vocal pathology for adults and children: intervention strategies for organic, behavioral and psychological voice disorders: rehabilitation team approach to voice-resonance problems associated with cleft palate. Pre: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

CMD 561: Phonological Disorders: (3 crs.) Assessment, design, and implementation of therapeutic management programs for various speech production disorders at the articulatory and phonological levels. (Lec. 3) Pre: CMD 372, 373, 374, 375, or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

CMD 562: Speech-Language Pathology for Audiologists A,B,C: (1-3 crs.) Speech-language pathology for audiology students. Language disorders in children, speech sound disorders, speech/language change and disorders in adults. Modular format with variable credits (Lec. 1-3) Offered alternate years in the spring semester.

CMD 563: Language Disorders in Infants and Toddlers: (3 crs.) The speech-language pathologist's role and responsibilities in the diagnosis and treatment of infants and toddlers (0-3 yrs.) either at risk for or exhibiting bona fide communication delays or disorders; family-centered approaches to intervention. (Lec. 3) Pre: graduate standing, completion of CMD 375 (Language development) or equivalent or permission of instructor. Offered alternate years in the spring semester.

CMD 564: Language Disorders In School-Aged Children: (3 crs.) Study of communication deficits in learning-disabled school-aged children; differential diagnoses; assessment of cognitive functioning; language processing and discourse; and therapeutic strategies for training abstract and functional language. (Lec. 3) Pre: graduate standing or permission of instructor.

CMD 569: Test and Measurement in Speech-Language Pathology: (3 crs.) Procedures for evaluation and diagnosis in speech-language pathology. Psychometric considerations in testing. Implications of evaluation information for differential diagnosis, prognosis, referrals, and therapeutic programs. Multicultural considerations in the diagnostic process. (Lec. 3) Pre: CMD 372, 373, 374, 375, 465 or equivalent; graduate standing or permission of instructor.

CMD 574: Hearing Conservation: (2 crs.) The auditory and non-auditory effects of noise on human beings. Hearing conservation plan development and monitoring as well as legal issues will be reviewed. (Lec. 2) Pre: permission of instructor. Offered Spring.

CMD 575: Management of Deaf and Special Populations: (3 crs.) Identification of needs related to health, communication, and quality of life in deaf and special populations. Management strategies and the audiologists role will be described. (Lec. 3) Pre: CMD 454 and 551. Offered Spring.

CMD 576: Cochlear Implants: (2 crs.) Concepts and issues related to cochlear implantation as a remediation for deafness in adults and children. Hardware, programming, rehabilitative, and surgical issues will be addressed. (Lec. 2) Pre: graduate standing in audiology or permission of instructor. Offered fall every third year.

CMD 577: Vestibular Rehabilitation and Tinnitus Management: (2 crs.) Management of the vertiginous patient to reduce symptoms and restore function. Tinnitus assessment and therapeutic strategies are reviewed. (Lec. 2) Pre: CMD 454, 551, and 572. Offered Spring.

CMD 580: Augmentative and Alternative Communication: (2 crs.) Review of unaided (manual) approches to communication. Discussion of aided methods using communication boards or other mechanical electronic devices. (Lec. 2) Pre: graduate standing or permission of instructor.

CMD 581: Dysphagia: (3 crs.) Basic introduction to the knowledge and skills needed by speech- language pathologists providing clinical services to dysphagic patients in medical settings. (Lec. 3) Pre: graduate standing or permission of instructor.

CMD 582: Motor Speech Disorders: (3 crs.) Neurosystem pathologies and mechanisms affecting speech. Prepares students to diagnose, assess, and treat adults with acquired motor speech disorders. (Lec. 3) Pre: Graduate standing and a neuroanatomy course or concurrent registration in CMD 377.

CMD 583: Acquired Cognitive Communication Disorders: (3 crs.) Study of acquired cognitive problems resulting from neurological disorders and diseases; differential diagnoses; assessment of the domains of cognition; and therapeutic strategies for cognitive rehabilitation. (Lec. 3) Pre: graduate standing.

CMD 584: Language Disorders in Developmentally Young Children: (3 crs.) Study of communication deficits in developmentally young and multi-handicapped children; types of language problems; differential diagnoses; assessment of conceptual requisites and concrete language skills; and interactive therapeutic strategies. (Lec. 3) Pre: graduate standing or permission of instructor. CMD 585: Language Disorders in Adults: (3 crs.) Provides basic information on the characteristics, assessment, and treatment of adults with acquired language disorders secondary to stroke, head injury, and progressive neurological diseases. (Lec. 3) Pre: graduate standing or permission of instructor.

CMD 592: Disorders of Fluency: (3 crs.) Study of nature and causes of stuttering; analyses of current theories and research concerning stuttering and cluttering; development of a rationale for diagnosis, case selection, and intervention. (Lec. 3) Pre: graduate standing and/or permission of instructor.

CMD 595: Instrumentation and Computer Use in Communicative Disorders: (1 cr.) Topics in applied instrumentation and computer use for students in speech-language pathology and audiology. Practical experience in calibration of instruments and the use of current professional software. (Lab. 2) Pre: graduate standing or permission of instructor. In alternate years.

PHT 511: Human Neuroscience and Neurology (5)- Anatomy, physiology, dysfunction, and evaluation of the human nervous system as a basis of therapeutic intervention. Gross and microscopic structure of the nervous system and the neurological examination (Lec. 4, Lab. 2) **Pre: second-year standing in D.P.T. or permission of chairperson.

PSY 533: Advanced Quantitative Methods In Psychology: (3 crs.) Advanced quantitative methods applied to psychology. Survey of methods such as multiple regression, multivariate analysis of variance, discriminant analysis, canonical correlation, principal component analysis, and factor analysis. Applications involve practice with computer programs. (Lec. 2, Lab. 2) Pre: PSY 532.

PSY 540: Learning Disabilities: Assessment and Intervention Learning Disabilities: (3 crs.) Applications of early screening batteries; remedial programs for various disabilities, including behavioral programs and methods for older children and adolescents. Emphasis on pragmatic application of skills for detection and treatment. (Lec. 3) Pre: permission of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

PSY 544: Reading Acquisition and Reading Disability: Research and Implications for Practice: (3 crs.) Examination of research on the language, cognitive, and reading characteristics of children who successfully learn to read and of those who encounter difficulty. Additional focus on the implications and use of the research for assessment and instruction. (Lec. 3) Pre: graduate standing or permission of instructor.

PSY 601: Physiological Psychology: (3 crs.) An advanced consideration of physiological research on neural, endocrine, and response systems as they relate to attention, motivation, emotion, memory, and psychological disorders. Counts as a "core course" for graduate study in psychology and includes an historical perspective. (Lec. 2, Lab. 2)

PSY 602: Learning and Motivation: (3 crs.) Empirical and theoretical analysis of the basic principles of acquisition and loss of habits. Topically organized to deal with respondent and operant conditioning, and their relationship to reinforcement and motivation. Counts as a "core course" for graduate study in psychology and includes an historical perspective. (Lec. 3) Pre: undergraduate learning course.

PSY 603: Development: (3 crs.) Theoretical, methodological, and applied issues in life span development, including cognitive, perceptual, psychomotor, affective, and social development. Topically organized. Counts as a "core course" for graduate study in psychology and includes an historical perspective. (Lec. 3)

PSY 604: Cognitive Psychology: (3 crs.) A survey of the theoretical and methodological issues in human cognition. Topics include pattern recognition, attention, memory, language, problem solving. Counts as a "core course" for graduate study in psychology and includes an historical perspective. (Lec. 3)

PSY 605: Personality: (3 crs.) Reading of primary source materials from major personality theorists relevant to a particular topical emphasis. Application and comparative evaluation of the theories studied. Counts as a "core course" for graduate study in psychology and includes an historical perspective. (Lec. 3)

PSY 606: Social Psychology: (3 crs.) Intensive exploration of the methods, theory, and database of contemporary social psychology focusing on salient issues that clarify significant topics in this area. Counts as a "core course" for graduate study in psychology and includes an historical perspective. (Lec. 3)

PSY 607: Advanced Psychopathology: (3 crs.) A review of the multicultural, theoretical, clinical, and empirical literature related to the development, classification, and diagnosis of psychopathology. Counts as a "core course" for graduate study in psychology and includes an historical perspective. (Lec. 3)

PSY 609: Perception: (3 crs.) A survey of topics in the psychology of perception, including sensory function; psychophysical models, measurement, and scaling; visual perception; and methods for analyzing perceptually guided behavior. Counts as a "core course" for graduate study in psychology and includes an historical perspective. (Lec. 3)

The Program

The Interdisciplinary Neuroscience Program (INP) offers a Master of Science (M.S.) degree, Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree, or a Certificate in the Neurosciences. The program provides broad instruction across several neuroscience disciplines and gives students an opportunity to focus on a specific area of specialization.

Executive Committee Organizational Chart

News

RINC

Request for Proposals Rhode Island Neuroscience Collaborative Pilot Study Awards - Deadline for Applications: April15, 2014