Skip to main content
Scenes from The University of Rhode Island

URI’s Senior Seminar Student Thesis Show Opens, Dec. 1

Media Contact:

Main Gallery, URI Fine Arts Center, 105 Upper College Road
Artist Reception December 1, 2008 4 to 6:30pm
Dates: December 1 - 10, 2008
Hours: 12 to 4 p.m. Mon - Thurs & Sat.

Kingston, R.I.-- November 24, 2008 - Eleven University of Rhode Island seniors’ work will be showcased at URI’s Art & Art History Department ‘s Main Gallery, Fine Arts Center, 105 Upper College Road, Kingston.

The Senior Seminar class is a capstone experience in the studio arts program at URI. After experimenting in various media in their sophomore and junior years, students focus on a cohesive project for the entire semester. Students initiate their own projects and participate in critical exchanges with each other, participating faculty and visiting artists.

The exhibition includes drawing, digital imaging, painting, photography and sculpture. Adam Carter creates an explosion of images through a visual diary.

Kelly Danielson’s colorful abstract painting explores issues of fertility. Carrie Edens makes dolls seem almost life like and animated through their body language and sometimes color coordinated environments. Jessica Gabeler uses humor to explore the extremes that women will take to look “beautiful” influenced by the everyday barrage of media imagery. Amelia Green’s surreal infrared landscapes are enhanced by the use of the plastic lensed Holga camera.

The dark and subtly colored photographs of melancholy belong to Tim Howe. Chris Murphy makes a droll statement about the Chiquita company’s complex history in South America through a sculpture and mask molded from smoked banana skins. Jen Plante’s paintings convey the suffering experienced from mental illness and medication. Brendan Sullivan’s psychedelic painting conveys our destructive imprint on the planet. Anita Lojek’s photographs explore her Polish American identity using humor and memory through the use of family snapshots. Joseph Silver’s oil paintings convey the luminosity and vivid color of jellyfish caught in motion.

For more information on the exhibition, contact Annu Palakunnathu Matthew,
18percent@uri.edu or 401 521 4602.