Skip to main content
Department of Art and Art History banner

Studios & Galleries

Studio Facilities

 

Printmaking

Three adjoining studios are dedicated to printmaking:
  • The relief printing studio has two Vandercook presses and a variety of typefaces. Students primarily work on linoleum.
  • For intaglio printing there are two American French tool presses with the capability of printing up to 22"x30". Students learn traditional etching techniques that include line etching, drypoint, aquatint and soft-ground.student printmaking
  • The lithography room has two lithographic presses and numerous lithographic stones. In lithography students work both on stone and aluminum plate. There is a small darkroom where students expose plates for photolithography.

 

Newer processes are being introduced including pronto plates and solar plates. During the summer session there is an intensive course in monotype, "The Painterly Print". In addition, we participate in the Arches Biennial Student Print Exhibition sponsored by the Boston printmakers and held at the 808 Gallery at Boston University.

Painting

The department's painting courses emphasize a broad range of approaches in terms of techniques and methods. Designed on traditional principles of color theory, composition, and materials they have been upgraded to include elements of digital arts and design as well as other new and dynamic ways to explore techniques and materials:

The 1,000 square-foot room, with cathedral ceiling, and next to the sculpture lab facilities, has ample storage space for large format paintings, easels and tables to accommodate Painting, I, II, and III, and space for Design and Studio Seminar courses. Large studio class critiques and individual exchanges with visiting artists and faculty are often held in the painting room.

The goal in painting is to provide a strong foundation in basic thought, methods, and materials, while at the same time engaging in experimental practice. To this end the painting room is a dedicated space in which young artists are encouraged to explore and begin to understand their creative potential.

Sculpture

The sculpture lab in the Art and Art History Department has been thoughtfully assembled over the last three decades. A broad range of tools and equipment has been added, subtracted, and upgraded in a dynamic search for exciting ways to explore space and materials:

  • Computer-controlled kiln, which makes it possible to cast glass as well as large ceramic projects.
  • Lamp torch for hot glasswork using tubing and solid rod.
  • Students are constructing a small open source foundry furnace to cast bronze and aluminum.
  • The metal working area is complete with oxygen/acetylene gas welding, mig and tig welding. Students also have access to a state of the art plasma cutter.
  • Full wood shop that consists of band saws, table saw, sanders, compound miter saw and many hand tools.
  • Room dedicated to mold making and clay work equipment that includes a large pug mill and clay extruder.

The goal in sculpture is to provide a strong foundation in three-dimensional thought and methods at the same time engaging in experimental practice. The sculpture lab is a sanctuary in which a young artist can be free to explore and begin to understand their voice and identity in a complex visual culture.

Photography

The photography facilities consists of a black and white darkroom, a digital lab with professional epson printers and scanners, and a shooting studio. Also available for student use are cameras in various formats, lighting equipment and other related accessories.

 

Film and Video

In the department's film and video courses, students work with 16mm film cameras as well as digital video cameras. We have nine 16mm motion pictures cameras (7 Bolex cameras, 2 Beaulieu cameras, and 1 Arriflex S Camera). In the beginning production classes, students learn how to shoot on film, but edit on Final Cut Pro after their film has been transferred to tape. In the upper level film courses, students work in high definition video and use either the Canon Vixia HF 30, or the Canon AXH1 cameras. The department also provide sound recorders, boom poles, lighting kits, and tripods that the students can borrow for class projects.

The film courses are also supported by the Fine Arts computer lab, which is located on the lower level of the Fine Arts Center. This lab contains 20 24" 3.06 Ghz Intel Core Duo iMacs, 10 Sony HDV decks, and a LaCie Blu-Ray burner. Students use this facility to edit their films. In addition there is a smaller digital computer lab located in the department which consists of 5 G4 iMacs.

Some of the new and exciting things the students have been involved in:

  • Screened their work in Boston as part of Boston Open Screen.
  • Ana Mallozzi's piece "Untitled" was screened as part of the Best of Open Screen 2009 at the historic Brattle Theater in Harvard Square.
  • Visited the set of "As The World Turns", TV's second longest running drama series which tapes in Brooklyn, NY and talked with long time producer Carol Shure
  • Participated in a panel discussion on experimental found footage filmmaking at Fitchburg State University

 

Large Format Printers

These two large printers, 44 inches and 42 inches wide respectively, are now operational and ready for student use.  Students requesting to print on either printer may do so through their professor or through the lab monitor during print hours. Paper is provided but those wishing to use specific or exotic papers may need to provide their own.

  • The HP printer is a CMYK inkjet printer which can take paper up to 42 inches wide. It prints at a much lower quality but is inexpensive to operate and maintian. Its cost reflects this and is best used to print out drafts as quality can be an issue.
  • The Epson is a profesional inkjet printer with a width of up to 44 inches wide. It uses archival inks and uses a wider spectrum of colors to provide accurate color matching. This printer is best used for finished, final, or gallery work.

Further Information and Usage Form Can Be Found Here

 

 

Galleries

URI Main Gallery

Fine Arts Center
105 Upper College Road, Kingston, RI
401-874-5821
Hours: Monday - Saturday 12 - 4:00 p.m.

 

The Project Room

Fine Arts Center, Room F102
Hours: Monday - Thursday 12 - 4:00 p.m.
Contact: Ben Anderson, ben@benranderson.com, 401-874-2744

 

Corridor Gallery

Fine Arts Center, Main Corridor
The Corridor Gallery provides a venue for faculty, invited artists, and selected work from art classes. The Gallery is open during Fine Arts Center building hours.

Upcoming
Exhibitions & Events