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2010-2011 Catalog Online

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Philosophy (PHL)

Chairperson: Professor Foster

101 Critical Thinking (3)

Identification, formulation, and evaluation of both inductive and deductive patterns of reasoning. Consideration of topics such as probability, reasoning about causes, fallacies, foundations of argument, and the issues in logical theory. (Lec. 3) (EC) or (L)

103 Introduction to Philosophy (3)

Pursues such basic questions as: What is a person? What is knowledge? Are we free? What is moral right and wrong? Does God exist? What is the meaning of death? (Lec. 3) Not open to students with 9 or more credits in philosophy. (L)

204 Theories of Human Nature (3)

An introduction to philosophical inquiry by critical examination of some major traditional and contemporary views of human nature as expressed in a variety of religious, literary, scientific, and philosophical writings. (Lec. 3) (L)

205 Philosophical Topics (3)

An intensive study of one or more problems, issues, or topics of classical or current interest in philosophy. Emphasis on the analysis and construction of arguments relevant to the topic(s). Small class format. (Lec. 3)

210 Women and Moral Rights (3)

An introduction to the philosophical problems raised by reproduction, affirmative action, pornography, gender roles, and sexism in language through a critical examination of these issues. (Lec. 3) (L) [D]

212 Ethics (3)

Evaluation of major ethical theories. Application of moral reasoning to topics such as virtues and vices, human dignity, conscience, responsibility, moral dilemmas, and reasons to be moral. (Lec. 3) (L) [D]

215 Science and Inquiry (3)

The objective is to survey both the influence of philosophy on science and the influence of science on philosophy, all from a Western historical perspective. (Lec. 3) (L)

217 Social Philosophy (3)

A systematic introduction to the philosophical problems of contemporary social relations: models of community, sources of alienation, property and ownership, the meaning of work and technology, human rights and freedom. (Lec. 3) (L) [D]

235 Modern Thought: Philosophy and Literature (3)

Introduction to recent thought in philosophy and literature. Emphasis on Kierkegaard, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Sartre, and complementary literary texts. (Lec. 3) (L)

314 Ethical Problems in Society and Medicine (3)

Ethical analysis of topics such as war, capital punishment, sexual morality, suicide, animal rights, honesty and deception, world hunger, discrimination, abortion. (Lec. 3) Pre: 101 or 103 or one 200-level PHL course or permission of instructor. (L)

316 Engineering Ethics

See Engineering 316. (L) [D]

318 Power/Justice: Contemporary Critical Philosophies (3)

Study of contemporary critical philosophies in the traditions of Marxism, existentialism, postmodernism, and feminism, with emphasis on philosophers such as Habermas and Foucault. (Lec. 3) Pre: 101 or 103 or one 200-level PHL course or permission of instructor.

321 Ancient Philosophy (3)

Survey of major thinkers and schools of thought in Ancient Greece, including selected pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle. (Lec. 3) Pre: 101 or 103 or one 200-level PHL course or permission of instructor. (L)

322 Medieval Philosophy (3)

Survey of major thinkers and schools of thought in the Middle Ages, including Augustine, Anselm, Aquinas, and Ockham. (Lec. 3) (L)

323 Modern Philosophy: Descartes to Kant (3)

Survey of 17th- and 18th-century European philosophy. Includes, but is not limited to, empiricism, rationalism, and Kant’s critical philosophy. (Lec. 3) Pre: 101 or 103 or one 200-level PHL course or permission of instructor. (L) [D]

324 Recent European Philosophy (3)

19th- and 20-century British and European continental developments. Discussion of movements such as idealism, utilitarianism, existentialism, and phenomenology and of philosophers such as Hegel, Kierkegaard, Mill, Husserl, Sartre, and Heidegger. (Lec. 3) Pre: 101 or 103 or one 200-level PHL course or permission of instructor.

325 American Philosophy (3)

A study of American philosophy including such movements as puritanism, transcendentalism, pragmatism, naturalism, process-philosophy, realism, and philosophical analysis. (Lec. 3) Pre: 101 or 103 or one 200-level PHL course or permission of instructor. (L) [D]

328 The Philosophy of Religion (3)

A systematic and critical consideration of such topics as the existence and nature of God, the problem of evil, the relation of faith to reason, religious language, miracles, and immortality. (Lec. 3) Pre: 101 or 103 or one 200-level PHL course or permission of instructor. (L) [D]

331 East Asian Thought (3)

A study of the important philosophical and religious systems of China, Korea, and Japan; emphasis on Chinese traditions. (Lec. 3) Pre: 101 or 103 or one 200-level PHL course or RLS 131 or permission of instructor. (FC) or (L) [D]

341 Introduction to Metaphysics (3)

Analyzes topics such as person, mind-body, human action, freedom and determinism, causation, time, space, essence and existence, universals, and types of beings. (Lec. 3) Pre: 101 or 103 or one 200-level PHL course or permission of instructor.

342 Knowledge, Belief, and Truth (3)

Analysis of topics such as knowledge, belief, certainty, doubt, skepticism, faith, the ethics of belief, truth, error, perception, a priori knowledge, subjectivity and objectivity, and memory. (Lec. 3) Pre: 101 or 103 or one 200-level PHL course or permission of instructor.

346 Existential Problems in Human Life (3)

Discussion of ultimate questions of human existence such as meaning in life, personal commitment, human relations, suffering, despair, hope, freedom, authenticity, self-deception, death, God, and immortality. (Lec. 3) Pre: 101 or 103 or one 200-level PHL course or permission of instructor. (L)

355 Philosophy of Art (3)

Systematic problems arising from reflection on the creation and perception of works of art. (Lec. 3) Pre: 101 or 103 or one 200-level PHL course or permission of instructor. (L)

401, 402 Special Problems (3 each)

Course may vary from year to year, allowing one or more advanced students to pursue problems of special interest with guidance of instructor in conferences. One or more written papers. (Independent Study) Pre: 3 credits in philosophy and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

430 Philosophy of Law (3)

Critical evaluation of the basis of legal authority and legal decision making, covering topics in the areas of analytic and ethical jurisprudence as well as professional ethics for lawyers. (Lec. 3) Pre: 101 or 103 or one 200-level PHL course, and one 300-level PHL course, or permission of instructor.

451 Symbolic Logic (3)

Selected topics in modern symbolic logic including calculus of propositions, predicate calculus, and modal logics. Philosophical and mathematical aspects of the subject. (Lec. 3) Pre: 101 or MTH 131 or higher or permission of instructor.

452 Philosophy of Science (3)

Analysis of the nature and structure of scientific thought. Consideration of issues such as structure and types of scientific explanation, verification and falsification, and unity of the sciences. (Seminar) Pre: 101, 215, or 451, one 300-level PHL course, and 6 credits of natural science; or permission of instructor.

453 Philosophy of the Social Sciences (3)

Examination of philosophical problems raised by contemporary social sciences: the meaning of scientific knowledge, the nature of understanding of other persons and cultures, the relation of theory and practice. (Seminar) Pre: 101 or 103 or 204 or permission of instructor.

454 Philosophy of the Natural Environment (3)

An exploration of our problematic relationship to the natural environment: nature’s ontological status, the epistemological encounter with nature through science and art, and the ethical obligations emerging from these considerations. (Seminar) Pre: 101 or 103 or one 200-level and one 300-level course in philosophy, or permission of instructor.

490 Senior Seminar in Philosophy (3)

In-depth study of the major works of a significant Western philosopher or of a major philosophical topic. (Seminar) Pre: senior standing in philosophy or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

499 Senior Thesis (3)

Independent research. Student works in close conjunction with a faculty member on a mutually agreeable topic. Written thesis required. (Independent Study) Pre: senior standing and permission of instructor. Not for graduate credit.


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