UNIVERSITY OF RHODE ISLAND

The Graduate School

Curricular Report from the Graduate Council to the Faculty Senate

Report No. 2000-2001-3A: Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs

 

At Meeting No. 365, held on 27 October, 2000, the Graduate Council approved the following proposal which is now submitted to the Faculty Senate.

SECTION I

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

ABSTRACT

The Graduate Council approved a proposal from the Graduate School and the Alan Shawn Feinstein College of Continuing Education that seeks authority to develop and approve a category of programs known as Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs. Because this proposal requires no new resources, the Graduate Council questioned the appropriateness of the usual A, B, C, rating system. However, on the premise that no new resources would be required for the implementation of the proposal, and because the proposal was deemed to be of significant merit, it was approved at the Class A level.

BACKGROUND

Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs would use existing courses to respond to professional and workforce needs, to provide opportunities for colleges and departments to explore new curricular areas within and across departmental boundaries and for program revitalization and enrichment. The programs would be made up of a series of courses that focus on a specific body of knowledge, are part of an existing graduate program or programs and that are between 12 and 15 credit hours of course work. The proposal asks that authority to approve such programs reside within the University without the requirement for approval of each program by the Board of Governors for Higher Education.

The proposal for Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs was reviewed under the process established by the Faculty Senate in which the Graduate Council serves as the Coordinating and Review Committee. Announcements of the receipt of the proposal were sent to the President and Joint Educational Policy Committee, the Provost and the Council of Deans, the Budget Office, and Department Chairs and Directors. Recommendations were sought from each of these, and the comments received are appended. Comments and recommendations received by 27 October have been kept on file in the Graduate School and were considered in the Graduate Council's review.

The response from the Budget Office noted that the proposal required no new resources, and therefore would have no budgetary impact. The Council of Deans was strongly supportive of the proposal. In response to concern among the Deans that the proposal would not allow for programs that are Post Master's or Post Doctoral, Council observed that each of these is also Post Baccalaureate, and would therefore be covered by the proposal. While the JEPC raised several questions, the group endorsed the proposal and indicated that further review by the group was not necessary.

SECTION II

RECOMMENDATION

The Graduate Council approved the Post Baccalaureate Certificate proposal at its regular meeting on 27 October, 2000. Council had difficulty in using the ranking system because the system is tied to the allocation of funds and this proposal requires no additional funding. After considerable thought and discussion, Class A approval of the proposal was granted on the basis of the proposal's merit and with the understanding that no new resources would be required.

A Proposal to Grant Authority to the University to Develop and Approve

Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs

A. GENERAL INFORMATION

1. Name of Institution: University of Rhode Island

2. Administrative Unit(s): The Graduate School and the Feinstein College of Continuing Education

3. Title of Proposed Organizational Change: Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs

4. Intended Date of Organizational Change: As soon as authority granted with anticipated date of first certificate program approved, spring 2001.

5. Intended Location of Organizational Change: University of Rhode Island

6. Institutional Review and Approval Process:

Date Approved

Graduate Council (New Program Review Committee)

March 31, 2000

Graduate Council

October 26, 2000

Faculty Senate

President of the University

7. Summary of the Proposed Organizational Change: (abbreviated)

The University of Rhode Island seeks authority to develop and approve a category of programs known as Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs. These programs are a series or sequence of courses that focus on a specific body of knowledge, that are part of an existing graduate curriculum and that are between 12-15 credit hours of course work. Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs use existing course capacity to respond to professional and workforce development needs, to provide opportunities for colleges and departments to explore new curricular areas within and across departmental boundaries and for program revitalization and enrichment.

It is entirely consistent with the University's mission to transmit and foster the application of knowledge in order to meet the changing needs of its constituency through the development and delivery of Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs. Furthermore, such programs address one of Rhode Island's Higher Education Board of Governors goals and priorities for 1999-2002 which is "to support a full range of quality academic programs within the system while maintaining the flexibility to meet changing workforce needs and supporting the state's economy."

8. Signature of the President:

_________________________________________

Robert L. Carothers, President

9. Persons to be contacted during the review:

Harold Bibb

Edmund Ferszt

Associate Dean

Associate Dean

Graduate School

Alan Shawn Feinstein CCE

874-2262

277-5468

Virginia Nardone

Director, Feinstein CCE

Graduate Professional Center

277-5050

B. RATIONALE

1-3. Nature and Special Features of the Program and How it Responds to Student Needs

The University of Rhode Island seeks authority to develop and approve a category of programs known as Post Baccalaureate or Graduate Certificate Programs.

The defining criteria for Graduate Certificate Programs are as follows:

* The courses that comprise such a Certificate Program are part of an existing graduate curriculum of the University and focus on a specific area or particular body of knowledge.

* Admission to the program is based on an admission policy in keeping with current Graduate School requirements. They need not be identical; however, specific requirements should be identified and noted.

* Completion requirements must be specified and should be the same as for degree programs (for example, classes must be passed with a grade of C+ or better, and the program must be completed with a B average or better.)

* Recognition of the completion of the Certificate Programs must be noted on the transcript.

Certificate Programs are distinct from Certification Programs. Certificate Programs, unlike Certification Programs, are not intended to meet licensure or professional practice requirements. Certificate Programs are areas of study that focus on both workforce and professional development needs.

Certificate Programs may fall wholly within a given department or discipline. Alternately, they might cross departments and be interdisciplinary in scope. Sponsoring departments or colleges will have the authority to make this determination. However, the proposal approval process requires that the sponsoring department(s) will make explicit how the projected certificate program focuses on a particular body of knowledge and what this area of knowledge is. Interdisciplinary programs will be subject to approval processes in each of the cooperating departments and/ or colleges, and will be jointly sponsored by the cooperating departments.

The proposed purpose(s) for developing a Graduate Certificate Program should fit within one or more of the following categories.

* Programs can be created in response to professional or workforce development needs.

* Programs can be created to provide flexible opportunities for colleges and departments to explore new curricular areas both within and across departmental boundaries.

*Programs can be created to provide opportunities for developing new resources at the departmental or college level.

* Programs can be created for program revitalization or enrichment by reaching out to new audiences or using new delivery formats.

The reasons for such programs are compelling. During the past two decades, changing demographics, economic development issues, and workforce needs have challenged universities to respond to college graduates who need to continuously acquire new knowledge and skills. Continuous learning has become imperative for individuals&emdash;whether they have an advanced degree or not&emdash;to remain not just employable but competitive in today's economy. During the current year (2000), graduate and professional degree enrollments are projected to reach 1.7 million nationally. The majority of these enrollments (63%) are expected to be on a part-time basis by individuals who are holding down a full-time job. Furthermore, many of those enrolling are supported by employers who have come to regard the continuous acquisition of new knowledge on the part of their employees as essential to their competitive edge. Consequently, universities that provide expanded opportunities for post baccalaureate education not only develop and help support a highly skilled labor force but can attract and sustain industries that depend on such a labor force. Finally, one of the Rhode Island Higher Education Board of Governors Goals and Priorities for 1999-2000 is "to support the full range of quality academic programs within the system while maintaining the flexibility to meet changing workforce needs and supporting the state's economy."

This proposal responds to these needs and issues using existing University resources to address both the workforce and professional development needs. The proposal seeks to establish a flexible and responsive mechanism which will allow the University to respond to these needs in a timely manner using existing graduate level courses and resources to create high quality programs. Finally, the proposed mechanism for the development and approval of Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs is consistent with existing University policies and procedures that govern the development and approval of graduate level courses and programs.

The foundation of the structure being proposed requires that the URI Graduate School be granted authority to approve all Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs provided they meet certain requirements and respond to specific criteria. The proposed process follows similar steps used within the existing departments or colleges. Certificate Programs must carry a department or college curriculum committee recommendation. In addition, this recommendation should carry with it a list of required resources, where such resources will come from, any impact on library, facility, equipment, or faculty resources, and a budget that indicates program development and operational costs.

Program development will be facilitated by a Certificate Program Development Panel comprised of representatives from the Graduate School, the Alan Shawn Feinstein College of Continuing Education and one elected representative from the participating academic units that are sponsoring Post Baccalaureate Programs. The CPD Panel will be a resource for any academic program, faculty or department that seeks to develop a Certificate Program. The Panel will accept a brief proposal indicating the clientele for the proposed Certificate Program, the needs that will be met, and the focus and purpose of the program, and a brief statement describing the way in which the program components will make up a coherent experience for certificate program students. The proposal for a new Certificate Program should contain a description of a coordinator who will administer the program. The proposal should include any partnerships or joint ventures between departments. Excess revenue over expenses and other overhead issues should be detailed as well as any other administrative or implementation expectations. The program delivery can be either traditional (i.e. 15 week, 3-hour lectures each week) or non-traditional (i.e. Web-based, CBT or compressed video) or a blend. However, proposals should indicate that an exploration of the relationship between the nature of the material, the needs of the audience, and the delivery format have been considered. The proposal should have a department head signature indicating that there is unit support for the preliminary phase of proposal development.

Finally, the proposal should have with it a time-line indicating when the proposed program is intended to begin operations. There should also be an indication of the times at which the proposed program is expected to move through the various approval stages and steps as a check against the desired start date. Consideration should be given to any pre-enrollment development and recruitment time as well as to the appropriate budget cycle if new resources are necessary.

The panel will work with those seeking to develop a Certificate Program to insure that the criteria have been met and to be a resource for information needs assessment, to help with procedures, and to problem solve issues encountered in developing the program. The panel will prepare a recommendation that will accompany the proposal when submitted to the Graduate School for endorsement. If the Graduate School endorses the program, it will be forwarded to the Faculty Senate for approval prior to implementation. If the Graduate School does not endorse the program, it may be returned to the sponsoring department for further study.

4. Program Clientele

Post Baccalaureate Certificates are designed for specific audiences that will vary according to the specific program. The primary source of students is expected to be members of the Rhode Island workforce who are seeking to upgrade their knowledge base in a particular field. Certificate Programs will attract new students to the University and are not expected to draw students from existing programs. Undergraduate programs in the particular field of study in which the certificate is offered may be a source of students; however, the majority of students will be new to the University.

5. Program Enrollments

Because the programs will be intended to be particularly attractive to working professionals, the programs will be designed for part-time students who will take one or two courses per semester. In those cases in which programs are set up in direct response to employer's requests, the program will usually enroll eight or more students per semester. In other cases, certificate students will enroll in currently offered courses provided for full-time graduate students. In the latter case, numbers of students enrolled to meet certificate requirements could be highly variable. However, because the certificate student would be enrolled in regularly scheduled courses, no additional resources would be required. The total number of students enrolled in programs covered by the umbrella will vary with the number of programs.

6. Admission Criteria

Admission to the program must be in keeping with existing Graduate School requirements, and sponsoring departments must explain and demonstrate this relationship. Completion requirements for Certificate Programs must be consistent with degree program requirements, and the recognition of the completion of the Certificate Program will be noted on the transcript.

The determination of satisfactory academic progress and the methods to be used in evaluation will be in keeping with current graduate program policy. However, sponsoring departments will describe the way in which such progress will be evaluated and discuss the appropriate level of advising, and indicate those responsible for its provision. This must take into account both pre-admission and advising that monitors student progress.

7. Use of Advisory Groups

Use of advisory or steering committees will be program specific. When a committee is used, their role is to serve as a professional resource for the program developers.

C. INSTITUTIONAL ROLE

1. Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs and Their Relevance to the Institutional Mission

For the University to develop and authorize Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs is entirely consistent with its mission to expand, transmit, and foster the application of knowledge in order to meet the rapidly changing needs of its constituency. University graduate education already provides rigorous advanced study and research opportunities for personal and professional development. Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs can invite new audiences to engage in graduate level education in a very focused way. While some Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs may be less broadly oriented by the very focused nature of their scope, they will be no less rigorous in the application of knowledge to real world problems.

2. Are Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs New or Existing?

These programs are both new and an extension of existing programs. They are new in that they may focus on one or more key or core competencies from a single, discipline-based, larger program and extend these to a new constituency or in a new format. Alternately, they may draw on multiple competencies from several existing programs restructuring them in response to new or changing learning trends.

3. Program Relationships

Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs may exist as a complete subset of a graduate curriculum and as such may create opportunities for participants to move from the Certificate Programs to the graduate program upon completion of the Certificate Program provided they meet all applicable admissions criteria. In this sense, they will take full advantage of existing program capacity and may provide a more knowledgeable and more fully prepared master's degree applicant. In addition, interdisciplinary Certificate Programs that draw from a broader base within the graduate curriculum may provide opportunities for those engaged in full-time graduate study in a single area to explore interdisciplinary linkages. Finally, Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs, while drawing from the existing graduate curriculum, are not duplicative of it.

D. CONTENT

This proposal seeks approval for the University to authorize Certificate Programs. Consequently, information on courses, faculty and requirements are presented here in a generic way focusing on the defining criteria for all programs. A sample Certificate Program is included in the addendum materials.

a. Program title and federal CIP code number will be provided by each department seeking Certificate Program approval.

b. Names of courses, departments, and catalog numbers will vary by submission and will be provided by the sponsoring department.

c. No new courses will be used.

d. Required courses will vary by Certificate Program.

e. No options available.

f. No course distribution requirements.

g. Free electives will vary by program.

h. Certificates will be a total of 12-15 credits in length.

1. 1&2. The overall construct of these programs is consistent with emerging national trends as indicated by a national study conducted by Wayne Patterson for the Council of Graduate Schools in 1998 and fall well within the recommended 8-15 credit parameters.

3. Curricula will vary by program.

4. Certification/licensing requirements are program specific and will be supplied by the sponsoring academic department.

E. INTERINSTITUTIONAL CONSIDERATIONS

1. Within Rhode Island, Salve Regina University and Roger Williams University have post baccalaureate certificate programs. The certificates are also referred to as pre-masters certificates. Certificates are offered in expressive arts, financial arts, gerontology, human resource management, information systems and management at Salve Regina and in accounting at Roger Williams University.

2. Within the New England region and nationally, post-baccalaureate certificates are offered by New Jersey Institute of Technology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, University of Connecticut, Northwestern University, University of Colorado Bolder, Kansas State University and others.

3. Because these programs usually will consist of existing URI courses that are packaged in a highly focused manner to meet the requirements of the certificate, it is anticipated that the use of transfer credits will be rare. However, it is possible that cooperative agreements with other public and independent institutions could be made. Proposals for individual Certificate Programs will carry this information.

4 -6There is no projected impact of this proposed program on other higher

education institutions within Rhode Island and there are no cooperative

arrangements or external affiliations with other institutions offering similar programs.

7. The determination of the Regional Program status of an individual Certificate Program will be made on an individual program basis and is likely to be influenced by the regional status of the degree program with which the certificate is most closely associated.

F. RESOURCES

1. Administration

Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs function, in effect, like curricular maps. They are similar in operation to the way an undergraduate minor works because the proposed category of courses already exists and is being administered through a department and college structure. Operational and administrative processes and personnel are already in place. Post Baccalaureate Certificates will use existing courses and administrative capacity and should have minimal effect on the administrative structure in which it is located.

a. Overseeing and managing the approval process for Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs will function in a similar way. That is to say, existing administrative structures in the form of the Graduate Council and the Faculty Senate will have the overriding responsibility to review and authorize Certificate Programs. They already function in this role, and the introduction of new Certificate Programs will have little impact on their workload.

One unique feature of the administrative process for managing Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs is the collaboration between the sponsoring academic unit, the Alan Shawn Feinstein College of Continuing Education and the Graduate School. Emerging national trends suggest that the most effective means of organizing and developing such programs require collaboration between the sponsoring academic unit, the graduate school and the continuing education unit. This kind of "shared model leadership" (Patterson, 1999) is intended to provide a flexible yet rigorous mechanism for the development and delivery of high quality graduate certificate programs. At the same time, this model insures such programs are responsive to the needs of the institution, its students, and the community it serves.

The proposal for a new Certificate Program should contain a description of a coordinator who will administer the program. This could include any partnerships or joint ventures between departments. Excess revenue over expenses and other overhead issues should be detailed as well as any other administrative or implementation expectations. Program coordinators should prepare a brief annual report to be submitted to the CPD Panel. Such a report should include financial information, the number of students starting and the number of students completing, plus other relevant information that will be helpful in determining the success of the program in meeting its goals. Should such reports not be forthcoming two years in a row, or should enrollment trends or fiscal issues indicate a lack of program viability, the CPD Panel will recommend program elimination. If such a recommendation is made, the Certificate Program must cease accepting any new students and must show how any students in the program will have sufficient opportunity to complete their program of study. Once such a plan is approved by the CPD panel, should a sponsoring department wish to initiate a new or revised Certificate Program, they must begin the steps outlined in this process again.

2. Faculty

Although instruction in certificate programs is expected to rely heavily on continuing University faculty, faculty selected to teach in the programs may be either fulltime or part time. Part time faculty will be expected to meet the same criteria as fulltime faculty who teach at the graduate level within the sponsoring departments. Program proposals must specify the criteria for faculty selection and indicate whether the potential pool of faculty will be part time or full time. No additions to the faculty are anticipated, no additional support personnel are needed, and all programs are self-supporting.

3. Learning Resource

Because Certificate Programs will be related to existing degree programs, the resources that support the degree program will also be available for Certificate Programs. Therefore, no additional expenditures are expected for Certificate Programs that are associated with degree programs supported by Ledger II. Ledger III Certificate Programs will be self-supporting.

4. Operating Expenses

Expenditure and revenue estimates will vary by program. Programs will be defined as Ledger II or Ledger III. If Ledger II funds are used, there will be no increase to the allocation of the department teaching the certificate program. Ledger III programs must be self-sustaining. Budget formats are included as an addendum.

G. EVALUATION

Program proposals will describe in detail the way in which the program's outcomes will be assessed and evaluated. Outcome evaluation must go beyond individual course or instructor evaluations (SETs) and examine how the proposed program has responded to the needs identified in the rationale for its development. Assessment and evaluation may include exit interviews and follow-up interviews with students, follow-up surveys with employers or relevant industry segments to determine the impact the students' completion of the certificate.

Program coordinators should prepare a brief annual report to be submitted to the CPD Panel. Such a report should include financial information, number of students starting and the number of students completing, plus other relevant information that will be helpful in determining the success of the program in meeting its goals. Should such reports not be forthcoming two years in a row, or should enrollment trends or fiscal issues indicate a lack of program viability, the CPD Panel will recommend program elimination.

If such a recommendation is made, the Certificate Program must cease accepting any new students and must show how many students in the program will have sufficient opportunity to complete their program of study. Once such a plan is approved by the CPD Panel, should a sponsoring department wish to initiate a new or revised Certificate Program, they must begin the steps outlined in this process again.

Finally, the proposal should include a time-line indicating when the proposed program is intended to begin. There should also be an indication of how and when the proposed program will move through the various approval stages and steps as a check against the desired start date. Consideration should be given to any pre-enrollment development and recruitment time as well as the appropriate budget cycle if new resources are available.

Post Baccalaureate Certificate Program Procedures/Steps

Departments/Programs/Colleges

1. Obtain guidelines for proposal development and consult with CPD Panel.

2. A brief statement of intent to prepare a proposal, including rational, is submitted to the CPD Panel by the Dean or department head of the sponsoring unit.

3. Proposal is prepared using specified formats.

Certificate Program Development Panel (CPD)

1. Receipt of program proposal by the CPD Panel.

2. Evaluate the proposed program according to the following criteria:

a. Extent to which program uses a specific area or particular body of knowledge to address a professional or workforce development need.

b. Extent to which program proposal examines the relationship between the nature of the material, the needs of the audience and the delivery format.

c. Extent to which the program identifies a particular workforce or professional developmental need.

d. Any projected cost or administrative issues not identified or clearly accounted for.

e. Insure that all required information is included or appended.

f. CPD Panel forwards proposal to New Program Review Committee with comment and recommendation.

Graduate Council (New Program Review Committee)

1. Receipt of program proposal in Graduate School

2. Notification and Comment

a. Notify appropriate units of the University of the proposal, call for comment on the proposal and set deadlines for receipt of comment (at least 30 and no more than 45 days from time of call for comment). Council is notified at this time. Other units to be contacted will include all departments, colleges, or other units directly involved or affected by the proposal, and must include the Council of Deans and the Joint Educational Policy Committee.

b. Comments submitted in response to a proposal must be made available for inspection. The report to the Senate must indicate the persons and/or groups who have submitted comments, and indicate where the comments are on file and available for review.

3. Evaluate the proposed program according to the following criteria:

a. Extent to which the program would contribute to the University's fulfillment of it's teaching and service responsibilities.

b. Relationship of the program to the developmental plans of the University.

c. Any unidentified issues or concerns including an unanticipated budget or curricular impact.

4. Recommendation is made to Graduate Council by New Programs Committee, and Graduate Council votes approval or disapproval.

5. If approved, Graduate Council, with advice from New Program Committee, arrives at a recommendation for the proposal.

6. Forward the proposal, or a revised version of the proposal, with its report and recommendations to the Faculty Senate for subsequent action. Unless an extension of up to 30 calendar days has been authorized by the Faculty Senate Executive Committee, the report must be submitted no later than 30 calendar days after the deadline set for receipt of responses on a proposal.

POST BACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATE

PROPOSAL FORMAT

PROGRAM INFORMATION

Sponsoring departments must provide the following:

1. Name of department(s), division(s), school(s) or college(s) involved

2. Title of proposed program

3. Intended date of program implementation

4. Anticipated date for granting of first certificate

5. Intended location of program

6. Description of Program

a. Describe the specific area or particular body of knowledge on which the program focuses

b. Explain how the program addresses or meets a workforce or professional development need

c. Identify the existing graduate curriculum(s) that the program courses will be drawn from and list the courses (not to exceed 15 credit hours)

d. Indicate other potential benefits of the program

e. Define admission criteria including any specific requirements

f. Describe Completion Requirements

g. Identify faculty (either full time or adjunct) and if there are any unique selection factors

h. Explain delivery format as either traditional (i.e. 15 weeks, 3-hour lectures each week) or non-traditional (i.e. Web-based, CBT or compressed video) or a blend. Please describe the relationship between the nature of the material, the needs of the audience and the delivery format

i. Explain how student progress will be monitored and who will do it. This should take into account advising both prior to admission and advising that monitors student progress

j. Describe how the program will be administered within existing departmental structure and identify who will function in the role of coordinator and any budget considerations

k. Explain how program outcomes will be assessed and evaluated. Outcomes must be identified in relationship to program purpose (see 6a) and must go beyond individual course or instructor evaluations (SETs) and may include exit interviews, follow-up surveys with employers or relevant industry segments to determine what impact the students' completion of the certificate has had.

7. Time frame of program initiation

8. Additional considerations not noted above

* * * * * *

Draft of a Sample Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Proposal in Labor Relations and Human Resources

A Proposal for a Graduate Certificate in Labor Relations

and Human Resources

A. General Information

1. Name of department:

Charles T. Schmidt Labor Research Center

2. Title of proposed program:

Graduate Certificate in Labor Relations and Human Resources

3. Intended date of implementation:

January 2001

4. Anticipated date of granting first certificate:

December 2001

5. Intended location of program:

Kingston

6. Description of the program

Rationale: This program is designed to provide students with a fundamental understanding of labor relations and human resources. The target group is students (both experienced and new graduates) who possess a Bachelor's degree from an accredited institution of higher learning in any field who wish to study Labor Relations or Human Resources at the post-graduate level and who (a) at the time of application do not seek admission to the M.S. degree program; or (b) at the time of application, seek to explore these fields of study, with possible plans to later apply for admission to the M.S. degree program. Some of these students may have professional experience in Labor Relations or Human Resources.

As outlined below, students may choose from a wide array of courses related to labor relations and human resources. The specific program of study pursued by individual students will be geared to meet the student's individual needs and interests, as determined by the student in consultation with the Director of the Schmidt Labor Research Center and LRC faculty.

b. Workforce or professional development need: It is anticipated that the Graduate Certificate Program in Labor Relations and Human Resources will serve the needs of mature students currently employed or aspiring to a labor relations or human resources position with management, labor unions, or government agencies as well as those who may be working in a non-Human Resource or Labor Relations position, but whose job nonetheless requires some understanding of Human Resources or Labor Relations issues. The Graduate Certificate program is designed to provide these individuals with the fundamental background in Labor Relation and/or Human Resources relevant for their positions.

c. Existing graduate curriculum: As outlined below, all courses in the Graduate Certificate Program will be drawn from currently existing courses offered by the Schmidt LRC as part of its Master's degree program.

d. Other potential benefits: Mature students are often reluctant to make the commitment required by a full-fledged Master's degree program such as the one currently offered by the LRC. At the same time, the completion of non-degree coursework provides students with little recognition and, consequently, fewer incentives to pursue post-graduate education. It is anticipated that the Graduate Certificate will encourage these students to pursue further professional development. Furthermore, it is expected that some students will apply to the Master's degree program subsequent to their completion of Graduate Certificate Program.

e. Admissions requirements: Admission requirements would be identical to those currently in effect for the M.S. degree program. Students may be admitted with full status or as "promising students".

f. Completion requirements: A minimum of four courses from those listed below, completed within a 2-year period with a GPA of at least 3.0. No grades below "B" will be counted toward the four-course certificate minimum. All rules respecting scholastic standing as promulgated by the Graduate school and described in the University Catalog are applicable to the certificate program.

No transfer courses from other institutions will be accepted as fulfilling these requirements.

g. Faculty: Full-time and adjunct faculty currently associated with and teaching in the Master's degree program offered by the LRC.

h. Delivery format: Initially traditional, although the LRC expects to explore the efficacy of alternative delivery formats in the future.

i. Monitoring of student progress: Students will complete a program of study in consultation with the LRC Director. The Director will evaluate the student's progress toward the completion of that program of study each semester and advise the student accordingly.

j. Administration of program: The Graduate Certificate Program will be administered by the Director of the Labor Research Center as a part of existing duties.

k. Assessment and Evaluation of Program Outcomes: Program outcomes will be evaluated on the basis of application and graduation rates and on the extent to which Certificate recipients apply for the Master of Science degree program in Labor Relations and Human Resources. In addition, the LRC will survey existing students and alumni of the program to assess strengths, weaknesses, and overall success of the program.

1. Time Frame of Program Initiation: Spring Semester 2001.

m. Additional Considerations -- Transfer to the M.S. Degree Program: Since admission requirements are identical to those for the M.S. Degree Program, students who successfully earn a Graduate Certificate will automatically be admitted to the M.S. program with full standing.

Course List

1. Labor Relations Graduate Certificate (choose four of the following)

a. LRS/SOC 432 Industrial Sociology

b. LRS/MGT 500 Labor Relations and Human Resources

c. LRS 520 Developments in Worker Representation

d. LRS/PSC 521 Comparative Labor Relations Systems

e. LRS/ECN 526 Economics of Labor Markets

f. LRS 531 Employment Law

g. LRS 532 Seminar in Employment Law

h. LRS 533 Pensions, Health Care, and Employee Benefit Programs

I. LRS 541 Labor Law

j. LRS 542 Collective Bargaining

k. LRS/PSC 543 Public Sector Labor Relations

1. LRS 545 Arbitration and Mediations of Labor and Employment Disputes

m. LRS 546 Negotiations and Alternative Dispute Resolution

n. LRS/EDC 579 Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining in Education

2. Human Resources Graduate Certificate (choose four of the following)

a. LRS/MGT 500 Labor Relations and Human Resources

b. LRS/ECN 526 Economics of Labor Markets

c. LRS 531 Employment Law

d. LRS 532 Seminar in Employment Law

e. LRS 533 Pensions, Health Care, and Employee Benefit Programs

f. LRS/MGT 551 Human Resource Strategy

g. RS 541 Labor Law

h. MGT 630 Organizational Behavior

i. MGT 640 Compensation Administration

j. MGT 641 Human Resource Development

k. PSC/LRS 503 Problems in Public Personnel Administration

* * * * * *

ATTACHMENT #1

Mime-Version: 1.0

Date: Wed, 29 Nov 2000 16:51:12 -0400

To: hbibb@uri.edu

From: "M. Beverly Swan" <cygnet@uri.edu>

Subject: JEPC Response to Proposals

Cc: blord@uriacc.uri.edu, CNX101@uriacc.uri.edu,sheilafs@uriacc.uri.edu

Harold,

As we discussed on the phone, the Joint Education Policy Committee (JEPC) met yesterday to review two proposals. The group's comments follow:

1. Center for Midwifery at Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island.

The group took a formal vote to approve the Center and asked that the following comments be forwarded:

"Supplement salaries of midwifery faculty members (p.3.)." The JEPC wants to be sure that such supplements are in accordance with University and Collective Bargaining practices and policies.

"It is anticipated that it will take 3-5 years to become a viable and independent practice (p.6.)." The JEPC suggested that clarification of the concept of independence was needed. Is this financial independence or does it mean independence from the University or something else?

2. Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs

The JEPC endorsed the concept of post baccalaureate certificate programs but suggests that the following areas need to be addressed:

Certificate programs need not be tied to the ASF College of Continuing Education. We may also want to do some in Kingston and in the summer, etc.

Continuing faculty should dominate any certificate programs (as stated, a student could earn a URI certificate and never take a course from a tenure-track faculty member).

The proposal talks about a "Sponsoring college/department." How will interdisciplinary programs be established? Who will sponsor them?

How will coherence be guaranteed among the four courses (i.e., can a student take any four courses from a list and call it a certificate?)?

The proposal might include more examples of certificate programs and identify markets as illustrations.

Why must these use only existing courses? Why shouldn't we try some new areas?

Is guaranteed admissions to a graduate program as a result of completing a certificate program appropriate?

I hope these comments are useful to you.

Beverly

ATTACHMENT #2

TO: Harold Bibb, Associate Dean, Graduate School

DATE: November 28, 2000

FROM: Linda A. Barrett, Director, Budget

SUBJECT: Budgetary Impact Statement for Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs

In accordance with regulations detailed in section 8.85.11 of the University Manual, I have completed a financial review of the program proposal for Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs.

There are no additional resources required for the Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs. The proposed program will operate the same as the way an undergraduate minor works in that the proposed category of courses already exists and is being administered through a department and college structure. As indicated on the proposal, operational and administrative processes and personnel are already in place. Post Baccalaureate Certificates will use existing courses and administrative capacity and should have minimal effect on the administrative structure in which it is located.

According to the program, expenditure and revenue estimates will vary by program. Programs will be defined as Ledger 2 or Ledger 3. If Ledger 2 funds are used, there will be no increase to the allocation of the department teaching the certificate program. Ledger 3 programs must be self-sustaining.

The program will not draw students away from other programs as the clientele is expected to be members of the Rhode Island workforce.

Given the above, there appears to be no budget impact if this program is approved.

Mrng

Attachment

cc: M. Beverly Swan, Blair Lord

[mg/lb/harold bib-post baccalaureate certificate programs

RECEIVED

NOV 28 2000

UR1 GRADUATE SCHOOL

 

ATTACHMENT #3

MEMORANDUM

TO: Harold Bibb, Associate Dean, Graduate School

FROM: Blair M. Lord, Vice Provost for Academic Affairs

DATE: October 16, 2000

SUBJECT: New Program Proposals for Post Baccalaureate Certificate

Programs and Center for Midwifery

The Council of Deans at its meeting of October 11 reviewed the proposals for the Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs and the Center for Midwifery. The Council was strongly supportive of both proposals, but it did have a fairly lengthy discussion of the Certificate proposal with several comments and observations about it which I am conveying to you with this memo.

The issues raised with respect to the proposal for Post Baccalaureate Certificate Programs included the following. First, the designation as Post-Baccalaureate seems somewhat more restrictive than is probably intended. For example, any sort of post degree certificate program is probably what is really envisioned whether it be post baccalaureate, post master's, or even post doctorate. Perhaps the term "post graduate certificate" would be more appropriate. The Council also discussed the role of college faculty in the approval process. There was some discussion that a college faculty approval was advisable. In some cases, proposals may have cross-departmental effects which will not be well understood without a college-wide discussion. Finally, there was a conversation about the potential for problems associated with the mixing of Ledger #2 and Ledger #3 students and courses. For these certificates to work, courses supported from either ledger need to be leveraged so that the excess capacity can be utilized for the certificates. Dean Crocker has indicated that this confound can be accommodated, but this will have to be a very intentional part of any certificate program proposed and needs to be carefully considered in the development process.

One dean called me after the Council meeting to express a concern that the Certificate proposal was too narrowly construed. Because this view was not expressed during the Council's discussion, I asked him to write a separate memo to you. I cannot really comment on his issue. It did not come up during the Council's discussion. It is my hunch that the Council might not have agreed with him, but I cannot be sure of this.

I wish you good luck with all these programs as they move ahead.

rhb

c: M.B. Swan, C.B. Peters