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Section 7. Degree Requirements

7.10 General
7.20 Transfer Credits
7.30 Credit by Examination or Equivalent
7.40 Master's Degree Requirements
7.41 General
7.42 Time Limit
7.43 Program of Study
7.44 Programs with Thesis
7.44.1 Minimum Credit Requirements
7.44.2 Written Master's Examination (Optional)
7.44.3 Thesis Proposal (Required)
7.44.4 Thesis (Required)
7.44.5 Oral Defense of Thesis (Required)
7.45 Programs Without Thesis
7.45.1 Minimum Credit Requirements
7.45.2 Written Master's Examination (Required)
7.45.3 Oral Master's Examination (Optional)
7.50 Doctoral Degree Requirements
7.50.1 Definition of a Doctoral Degree
7.51 Time Limit
7.52 Program of Study
7.54 Minimum Credit Requirements
7.55 Qualifying Examination
7.55.1 General
7.55.2 Exemption from Qualifying Examination
7.56 Dissertation Proposal
7.57 Comprehensive Examinations
7.57.1 General
7.57.1.1 Part I - Written
7.57.1.2 Part II - Oral
7.57.1.3 Time Limit
7.58 Dissertation
7.58.1 Oral Defense of Dissertation
7.60 Scheduling of Examinations
7.70 Reporting the Results of Examinations

7.10 General

Section 7 states the minimum degree requirements acceptable to the Graduate School. All exceptions to the minimum requirements require the approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. However, individual graduate programs may include additional requirements beyond those listed here.

7.11. The successful completion of an approved Program of Study at the University is a fundamental requirement for each advanced degree. The Program of Study is developed around a specified number of graduate level courses selected according to the student's goals and background, but also includes other scholarly activities appropriate to the individual student and their specific area of interest and discipline. The Program of Study is planned by the student in consultation with, and subject to the approval of a major professor or of a program committee according to policies developed by the Graduate School and defined in this manual.

7.12. In addition to formal courses at the graduate level, an approved Program of Study usually includes independent study or other creative activity, research, and preparation of a thesis. For certain professional degrees, M.B.A., for example, the required program is quite specific; in other programs, the courses are selected and other requirements planned according to the needs of the individual student. Program credit will not include: preparation for language examinations, the teaching of courses, courses audited, courses failed (Sec. 10.11), courses at the 300 level or below, or courses needed to remedy deficiencies.

7.13. For information concerning the transfer of credits, time limits, and language requirements, see 7.20, 7.40, 7.50, in the following sections. It should be clearly understood and carefully noted that the requirements listed here for various advanced degrees are minimum requirements and that any department can require additional hours of work in formal courses or in other activities to remedy deficiencies or to achieve proficiency in a required area before a degree will be granted.

7.14. Each department that offers an advanced degree shall publish a policy statement covering specific departmental requirements, program requirements and departmental options in the Graduate Program Requirements section of the Catalog of the University of Rhode Island. A copy of detailed departmental procedures will be filed with the Dean of the Graduate School. Each student will be expected to comply with the procedures stated.

7.15. Although responsibility for a graduate student's program, including filing the Program of Study (see 7.43 and 7.52, 8.30) rests with the student and the major professor or doctoral committee, this does not preclude the establishment of general core requirements by a departmental or interdepartmental faculty committee. However, such core requirements should be held to a minimum, because the strength of a graduate student's program lies in its adaptation to the individual's needs.

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7.20 Transfer Credits

7.21. Transfer credits refer to credits earned for work taken at other accredited institutions of higher learning that the student wishes to apply toward satisfying URI degree requirements. Under usual circumstances, transfer credits may not exceed one-fifth of the total credits required in the program. The following cases apply:

  1. In a master's degree program the total of transfer credits, advanced standing credits (see section 3.33), and credits by examination or equivalent (see section 7.30) may not exceed two-fifths of the program's total credits. Under unusual circumstances, master's degree students may exceed the one-fifth rule on transfer credits; however, the total of advanced standing, transfer and credit by examination must still not exceed this two-fifths maximum.

  2. Ph.D. students admitted to the program without a master's degree in the same or a closely related area may transfer credits up to one-fifth of the total credits required in the program. As noted in section 3.33, such students may also separately include advanced standing credits and credits by examination or equivalent up to an additional one-fifth of the total program.

  3. Ph.D. students with a master's degree in the same or a closely related area from another accredited institution may request that up to 30 credits from this master's degree be applied to their doctoral program. With special permission of the Dean of the Graduate School, up to 6 additional credits in any combination of advanced standing and/or transfer credits may be applied to the doctoral program.

  4. Ph.D. students with a master's degree in the same or a closely related area from the University of Rhode Island may apply up to 30 credits from the master's degree toward the Ph.D. program. In addition, a total of up to 9 credits combining transfer and advanced standing are allowed.

    In all cases, transfer credit is granted only when the request is recommended by the student's major professor and the Graduate Program Director and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School.

7.22. Only courses offered primarily for graduate students and from accredited schools are eligible for transfer credit. Further, the student must have earned a grade that will satisfy the graduate degree requirements for graduate level coursework at that institution. Transfer from all international institutions, other than those specifically authorized by the Graduate Council, is limited to earned degrees equivalent to US master's degrees or better.

7.23. For credits to be transferred toward master's or doctoral degree requirements, the work must have been taken not more than seven years prior to the date of first registration in the student's current graduate degree program at the University of Rhode Island. In special circumstances, a waiver of this time limit may be approved by the Dean of the Graduate School if recommended by the student's major professor, program committee, Graduate Program Director, and University of Rhode Island faculty with expertise in the area.

7.24. The work must have clear and unquestioned relevance to the student's Program of Study as judged by the student's major professor, the Graduate Program Director, and the Dean of the Graduate School.

7.25. A student enrolled at the University of Rhode Island may receive transfer credit for work subsequently taken at another institution. However, to earn credit for such a course approval must be obtained in writing from the Dean of the Graduate School before the student enrolls in the course.

7.26. Any credit transferred from another institution of higher learning will be so indicated on the student's University of Rhode Island transcript. However, the grade earned at that institution will not be recorded or used in computing the student's scholastic average.

7.27. See also the section on credits earned by Non-Matriculating students (3.33) and the section on Credit By Examination or Equivalent (7.30) relating to this matter. 7.28. A student who is simultaneously enrolled in two different master's programs may request that credit for some graduate work in one program be counted toward degree requirements in the other program. The number of credits from one program that may be counted toward a second may not exceed one-fifth of the credits required in the second program. For example, consider simultaneous enrollment in two programs of 30 and 45 credits, respectively. The 30-credit program could include 6 credits from the second program; the 45-credit program could include 9 credits from the first. The total savings for the student would thus be 15 credits.

A student who is simultaneously enrolled in two different programs, one a master's program and one a Ph.D. program, may petition that up to one-fifth of the master's program credits be counted toward degree requirements in the Ph.D. program.

Transfer credit, advanced standing, and credits by examination (for a master's degree program) may be counted toward both programs as long as they satisfy the one-fifth rule above and meet all of the requirements of sections 7.20-7.27 and 3.33. Credit is granted to both programs only when the request is recommended by the student's major professor and the Graduate Program Directors for each program and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School.

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7.30 Credit by Examination or Equivalent

7.31. In master's and Ph.D. programs in which the student does not have a master's degree, a maximum of six credits may be allowed for competency based on experience outside the traditional academic setting and demonstrated by examination or equivalent. This maximum of six credits must fit within an overall maximum allowed for advanced standing and transfer credit. (See sections 3.33 and 7.21-7.28 of this Manual). The competency for which credit is allowed must be demonstrated by: (1) passing with a grade of B (3.00) or better, a written proficiency examination (which may be the final examination of an existing course) prepared by the instructor of an existing course most analogous or relevant to the experience, as determined by the Chair of the department in which it is offered in consultation with the instructor. This course must be at the 500 or 600 level, or (2) where no graduate level course offered by URI is analogous to the experience, submitting a scholarly paper, project or other evidence (but not just an oral examination, though an oral examination may form part of the procedure) which is certified by the Chair of the department most closely related to the subject matter as representing the equivalent of a grade of B (3.00) or better in a 500- or 600-level course. The advanced approval of the Dean of the Graduate School is required for such arrangements, and should be sought with a brief memorandum from the department Chair outlining the proposed credit by examination procedure. While these arrangements should be initiated by the student, they must be approved by the department Chair during the first semester after the student has been admitted to graduate study. Further, credits by examination or equivalent must be awarded during the first two semesters after the student has been admitted to graduate study. Department Chairs may ask any member(s) of their departments to assist them in this certification process where they consider it necessary.

7.32. If a credit by examination proposal is approved, the student will pay the required special examination fee to Enrollment Services and obtain a receipt which will be submitted to the Dean of the Graduate School along with a written report of the results from the department Chair. If the student has succeeded, the Dean of the Graduate School will request that Enrollment Services enter the appropriate number of credits on the student's transcript under the Department's Special Problems course number with a brief indication of the subject matter and the designation "credit by examination or equivalent".

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7.40 Master's Degree Requirements

7.41. The University offers programs for the master's degree with and without a thesis. For specific requirements and options, a student should consult the current University of Rhode Island Catalog, the department Chair, and the major professor.

7.42 Time Limit. The requirements listed here shall be met within five calendar years after the date when the student is first enrolled as a graduate student at the University. With the submission of a written request for an extension and a schedule for completion, endorsed by the major professor and the Graduate Program Director, a specific, time-limited extension may be approved by the Dean of the Graduate School.

7.43 Program of Study. It is in the best interests of graduate students to be guided in their work by a well designed Program of Study. Each student enrolled in a master's degree program shall submit four signed copies of a Program of Study to the Dean of the Graduate School for approval. Students are expected to submit a Program of Study as soon as is practicable, but not later than the end of the second semester of their program (see Section 9.10 for course distribution requirements). Signatures required include those of the student, major professor, and the Graduate Program Director or department Chair. The Program of Study includes courses that are to be taken for program credit, and those that are to be taken without program credit to remedy deficiencies, or for the student's personal satisfaction. Courses that are to be taken without program credit must be so designated before they are taken if failing grades are not to be included in the calculation of the student's overall grade point average, except as provided in Section 9. After a program has been approved, changes can be made by submitting a revised Program of Study for approval to the Dean of the Graduate School, signed by the major professor, the student, and the Graduate Program Director. Forms to be used for submitting the Program of Study are available at the Graduate School website.

7.44 Programs with Thesis

7.44.1 Minimum Credit Requirements: Accepted Programs of Study for master's degrees vary. The number of credits required for any individual student depends on previous training and the objectives of the program. Each student shall successfully complete an approved Program of Study with a minimum of 30 credits. At least 18 of these will be formal course credits exclusive of thesis, special problems, and directed studies; additional courses may be required either with or without program credit according to the needs of the student and the judgment of the major professor. The minimum required number of thesis credits allowed in the program is six; the maximum is nine. Under special circumstances, twelve thesis credits can be taken for program credit if approved in advance by the Graduate Council for that particular degree program and if a written justification for the 12 thesis credits is initiated by the major professor and endorsed by the student's thesis committee and the Graduate Program Director or department Chair. The justification should clearly indicate why the thesis is sufficiently different from a regular 6-9-credit thesis to require 12 credits of effort for its completion. Final approval of the justification will be made by the Dean of the Graduate School. Moreover, graduate programs will be composed of not more than 12 credits of thesis (599 courses), special problems (e.g. 591, 592, 691, or 692 courses) and directed studies. Additional thesis credits may be taken without program credit. For the course requirements and grade averages that must be maintained, see Sections 9 and 10.

7.44.2 Written Master's Examination (Optional): In those departments that require it, each student in a master's degree program shall pass a written examination when the formal coursework is nearly completed. The preparation and administration of the examination are the responsibilities of the department Chair in conjunction with a departmental committee designated for this purpose, or with the major professor. In either case members of a student's thesis committee from other departments should be consulted concerning preparation and grading of the examination. The time required for the examination will depend on the subject matter and the kind of examination chosen, but it should be scheduled for a minimum of four hours. The examination will explore the student's knowledge and analysis of their subject matter and the ability to use this information. Both the student and the Dean of the Graduate School will be notified promptly of the results of the examination in accordance with the procedure described in 7.70. A student who fails the examination may be permitted one re-examination in the part or parts failed if re-examination is recommended by the examining committee and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. The second examination may be taken only after an interval of ten weeks has passed, but before one year has elapsed.

7.44.3 Thesis Proposal (Required): A thesis proposal is required of all master's degree students and is intended to describe a problem to be investigated and provide details regarding how the research will be performed and reported. Approval signifies that it meets the standards of the University of Rhode Island for the master's degree. The proposal should present the required information as concisely and clearly as possible. The ability to describe concisely a research problem and methodology is one of the skills that the thesis proposal process is designed to develop. Therefore, thesis proposals are limited in length to the signature cover-sheet plus 15 or fewer double-spaced, numbered pages in a font size no smaller than 12 point. Proposals longer than this will not be accepted, however, appendices and references are not included in the 15-page limit. Proposals should be submitted before substantial research has been completed, typically during the first or second semester in which the student registers for research credits. In all cases, however, the proposal must be submitted at least one semester before the semester in which the thesis itself is to be submitted and defended. Complete details for the appropriate development, preparation, and submission of a thesis proposal can be found on the Graduate School website (www.uri.edu/gsadmis). Proposals will be returned for revision if they do not contain the appropriate sections described in the Proposal Instructions.

7.44.4 Thesis (Required): Each student shall prepare a thesis that will demonstrate ability to perform and report independent research in an acceptable scholarly fashion. See Section 11 for preparation of a thesis.

7.44.5 Oral Defense of Thesis (Required): The student shall successfully defend the thesis before a thesis defense committee in an oral examination, the duration of which is usually two hours. The thesis defense committee is selected and the examination is conducted according to procedures outlined in 8.40. A student who fails the oral examination may be permitted one re-examination in the part or parts failed if recommended by the committee and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. The second examination may be taken only after an interval of ten weeks has passed, but before one year has elapsed (See 7.74).

7.45 Programs Without Thesis

7.45.1 Minimum Credit Requirements: The number of credits required both with and without program credit will depend on the program and the student's previous training. The student shall successfully complete an approved Program of Study with a minimum of 30 credits in coursework and including at least one course that requires a substantial paper involving significant independent study. (If that study involves human subjects, the policy and procedures of the Institutional Review Board must be followed - see Appendix D. If the study involves live animals, the policy and procedures of the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee must be followed - see Appendix E.) Additional courses above the minimum may be required with or without program credit. The courses that are acceptable for graduate credit and the grade average that must be maintained are described in Sections 9 and 10.

7.45.2 Written Master's Examination (Required): A student in a program that does not require a thesis shall pass written master's examinations when the formal coursework is nearly completed. The design, preparation, and administration of the examination(s) are responsibilities of the Graduate Program Director in conjunction with a departmental committee designated for this purpose or with the major professor. The time required for the examination(s) will depend on the nature of the subject matter involved but it will be scheduled for a minimum of four hours. The examination(s) will be designed to explore the student's insights into the subject matter and ability to use this information. Both the student and the Dean of the Graduate School will be informed promptly of the results of the examination(s) in accordance with the procedure described in 7.70. A student who fails the examination may be permitted one re-examination in the part or parts failed if re-examination is recommended by the committee and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. A second examination, if permitted, may be taken only after a minimum of ten weeks has passed to allow for additional student preparation. In all cases, a second examination must take place before one year has elapsed.

7.45.3 Oral Master's Examination (Optional): In some departments, each student may be required to pass a final oral examination in addition to the written examination. The examination is usually not more than one and one-half hours long. The nature of the examination and the examining committee are entirely the responsibility of the department. The results shall be reported promptly to the student and to the Dean of the Graduate School as specified in 7.70. In case of failure, the examining committee has the option of allowing a second examination. If a second examination is permitted, it must be taken only after a minimum of ten weeks has passed to allow for additional student preparation. In all cases, a second examination must take place before one year has elapsed.

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7.50 Doctoral Degree Requirements

7.50.1 Definition of a Doctoral Degree: When a doctoral degree is conferred upon a student at the University of Rhode Island, it signifies that an intensive period of study and investigation in an established field of learning has been completed with high distinction. This period of investigation has been characterized by a mastery of the materials and methods of the chosen field of advanced study that is proven through a dissertation that adds to the sum total of human knowledge. Neither the accumulation of facts, however great in amount, nor the completion of advanced courses, however numerous, can substitute for the power of independent research and the proof of its possession that culminates in the dissertation, the quintessence of the doctoral degree. Doctoral degrees that do not strictly adhere to this definition may be granted through exceptions approved by the Graduate Council.

7.51 Time Limit. Doctoral students shall fulfill all requirements for the degree as described in the following sections of the manual within seven years of the date when the student is first enrolled in the doctoral program. (See Section 5 for residence requirements.)

7.52 Program of Study. Each doctoral student shall submit a Program of Study to the Dean of the Graduate School for approval. Students are encouraged to submit a Program of Study as soon as is practicable, but no later than the end of the second semester of their program. After a program has been approved, changes can be made by a petition for approval to the Dean of the Graduate School, signed by all members of the doctoral committee, the student and the Graduate Program Director. Each doctoral student shall submit at least six copies (three copies plus one copy for each member of the Ph.D. committee) of the Program of Study signed by all members of the doctoral committee (see 8.43.2), the student, and the Graduate Program Director. The Program of Study should specify the courses that are to be taken for program credit (see Section 9.20 for course distribution requirements) and those that are to be taken without program credit, to remedy deficiencies, or for the student's satisfaction. Courses in the Program of Study listed to be taken without program credit must be so designated before they are taken; if they are not, grades in these courses will be included in the calculation of the student's Grade Point Average. Forms to be used for reporting the Program of Study are available at the Graduate School website (www.uri.edu/gsadmis/).

7.54 Minimum Credit Requirements. The number of credits required will depend on the program in which the student is enrolled, the preparation of the individual student, and the Program of Study. Each student shall complete an approved Program of Study with a minimum of 72 credit hours beyond the baccalaureate degree, and at least 42 of these credits shall be taken at the University of Rhode Island. For students with a master's degree in the same or closely related area, up to 30 credits may be transferred from another accredited institution. Students who have graduate level credits from another institution but who did not have a master' s degree may be allowed to transfer 20% of the required courses if they are pertinent to the field and discipline in which the degree is to be taken. Courses taken more than seven years prior to the date of first registration in the student's current doctoral program at the University of Rhode Island cannot be transferred.

7.55 Qualifying Examination (Ph.D. degree only)

7.55.1 General: Students without a master's degree who are accepted into a Ph.D. program are expected to take a qualifying examination during their first two academic semesters. This examination is intended to assess a student's potential to perform satisfactorily at the doctoral level, and shall not consist of courses taken unless specific approval has been granted by the Graduate Council. If granted, the courses shall be listed in the University of Rhode Island Catalog. The type of examination to be used, whether it is to be written or oral, or both, and the preparation and administration of the examination(s) are the responsibilities of the Graduate Program Director in consultation with 1) a departmental committee designed for this purpose or 2) with the major professor. The procedure used for giving qualifying examinations shall be incorporated into the departmental procedure given to each new student and filed with the Dean of the Graduate School. Written qualifying examinations should be, in general, scheduled for a minimum of four hours and oral examinations a minimum of two hours. Both the student and the Dean of the Graduate School will be informed promptly of the results of the examination(s) in accordance with the procedure described in 7.70. A student who fails the examination may be permitted one re-examination in the part or parts failed if re-examination is recommended by the examiners and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. The second examination may be taken only after an interval of ten weeks has passed, but before one year has elapsed.

7.55.2 Exemption from Qualifying Examination: Exemption from Qualifying Examination: A student who has earned a master's degree in the same or a closely related field before being admitted to a doctoral program does not usually take a qualifying examination, but may be required to do so if the department recommends it. The decision whether or not to require a qualifying examination shall be made by the department at the same time that the application for admission is processed. Both recommendations shall be transmitted simultaneously to the Dean of the Graduate School by the chairperson of the department. When a qualifying examination is required, it will be stipulated at the time of admission.

7.56 Dissertation Proposal. A dissertation proposal is required of all doctoral students and is intended to describe a problem to be investigated and provide details regarding how the research will be performed and reported. Approval signifies that it meets the standards of the University of Rhode Island for the doctoral degree. The proposal should present the required information as concisely and clearly as possible. The ability to describe concisely a research problem and methodology is one of the skills that the dissertation proposal process is designed to develop. Therefore, dissertation proposals are limited in length to the signature cover-sheet plus 15 or fewer double-spaced, numbered pages in a font size no smaller than 12 point. Proposals longer than this will not be accepted, however, appendices and references are not included in the 15-page limit. Proposals should be submitted before substantial research has been completed, typically during the first or second semester in which the student registers for research credits. In all cases, however, the proposal must be submitted at least one semester before the semester in which the dissertation itself is to be submitted and defended. Complete details for the appropriate development, preparation, and submission of a dissertation proposal can be found on the Graduate School website (www.uri.edu/gsadmis/). Proposals will be returned for revision if they do not contain the appropriate sections described in the Proposal Instructions.

7.57 Comprehensive Examinations

7.57.1 General: Each doctoral student shall take comprehensive examinations at or near, but no later than twelve months after, completion of the formal courses stipulated in the Program of Study. Comprehensive examinations should be designed to assess a student's intellectual capacity and the adequacy of training or scholarly research. The comprehensive examinations that each student must pass shall consist of two parts as follows:

7.57.1.1 Part I - Written: This is a written examination of at least eight hours duration. When the student has met all prior requirements, the major professor will request permission from the Dean of the Graduate School to schedule the examination on specific dates. When the student's eligibility has been verified by the Graduate School, the Dean will authorize the student's major professor in consultation with members of the doctoral committee including those from other departments, to prepare, administer, and evaluate the examination. The major professor will arrange the time and the place the examination is to be given in consultation with the student and will notify the Graduate School. The doctoral committee shall review the results and shall make the final decision as to whether or not the student has passed. Unanimous approval by all members of the doctoral committee is required for passing. Both the student and the Dean of the Graduate School will be informed promptly of the results of the examination(s) in accordance with the procedure described in 7.70. Results of this examination are to be reported on the appropriate form. After the examination has been graded, the results will be accepted in partial fulfillment for the degree for which the student is registered for up to five years from the time the examination is taken. A student who fails this examination may be allowed one re-examination in the part or parts failed if recommended by the doctoral committee and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. A second examination, if permitted, may be taken only after a minimum of ten weeks has passed to allow for additional student preparation. In all cases, a second examination must take place before one year has elapsed.

7.57.1.2 Part II - Oral: The oral comprehensive examination shall be given only upon successful completion of, and normally within four weeks after, the written examination. This examination, usually two hours long, is conducted by the oral comprehensive examination committee, which consists of the doctoral committee and two additional Graduate Faculty members nominated by the major professor in consultation with the student, and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. One of the additional members will be from the same department or area while the other member will be from an outside area. The major professor is responsible for arranging the time and place of the examination in consultation with the student and all potential members of the oral examination committee and shall act as chairperson. The full oral examination committee must be present for the duration of the oral exam, including the discussion of the results and final vote. At the discretion of the major professor, who serves as chair of the examination committee, an oral exam may be open to other faculty members as non-voting observers. Faculty observers can ask questions if recognized by the major professor. At any time during the exam, however, the major professor can clear the room of all faculty observers. Non-faculty may not attend an oral exam. At least 10 working days in advance, permission to conduct the examination shall be requested from the Dean of the Graduate School, who will be responsible for formally scheduling the examination and notifying the student and all members of the committee. The student will be notified orally of the results of the examination as soon as the committee has completed its deliberations. The major professor is responsible for notifying the Dean of the Graduate School of the results of the examination promptly on the form provided for this purpose, signed by all members of the oral examination committee and acknowledged by the Graduate Program Director or department Chair. Unanimous approval by all members of the oral examination committee is required for passing. A student who fails the examination may be permitted one re-examination if re-examination is recommended by the committee and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. A second examination, if permitted, may be taken only after a minimum of ten weeks has passed to allow for additional student preparation. In all cases, a second examination must take place before one year has elapsed. (See 7.74)

7.57.1.3 Time Limit: The results of the written and oral comprehensive examinations will remain valid for five years from the time the examinations are taken.

7.58 Dissertation. The doctoral student shall submit a dissertation embodying the results of original investigation and comprehensive study of a clearly defined problem and making a contribution to the literature of the field. See Section 11 for details of the dissertation.

7.58.1 Oral Defense of Dissertation: The doctoral student shall successfully defend the thesis in an oral examination that is usually two hours long before the dissertation defense committee. This is composed of the doctoral committee and two additional members appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. See 8.43.4 and Section 11 on the committee and procedures. The full oral examination committee must be present for the duration of the oral defense of the dissertation, including the discussion of the results and final vote. In general, the oral defense of the dissertation is open to the university community and other interested observers. Observers may ask questions, if recognized by the Chair of the examining committee. At the discretion of this Chair, some or all of the observers may be asked to leave the examination room, if in the opinion of the Chair, the presence of the observers is detracting from the ability of the student to answer questions from the examination committee. A student who fails the examination may be permitted one re-examination if recommended by the committee and approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. A second examination, if permitted, may be taken only after a minimum of ten weeks has passed to allow for additional student preparation. In all cases, a second examination must take place before one year has elapsed. (See 7.74) Passing the oral defense of the dissertation does not automatically imply that the dissertation is acceptable as defended. The dissertation will be approved only after all the corrections stipulated by the dissertation defense committee are incorporated in the thesis in final form. For dissertations judged to be acceptable except for typing errors and/or minor changes in style or content, the major professor or Chair of the dissertation examining committee is responsible for certifying that all corrections have been made. For dissertations judged to be acceptable only after significant changes in content are made, the major professor and any defense committee members so designated at the defense will be responsible for certifying that all corrections have been made.

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7.60 Scheduling of Examinations

7.61. Scheduling of oral and written examinations, including qualifying, comprehensive, and defense of theses/dissertations will be done only at the convenience of the faculty members involved, and will be scheduled depending upon the availability of the student's program committee and additional qualified examiners. Faculty cannot be required to participate in examinations during the summer months if they are not under contract. Students must be registered for any semester or summer term in which they take an examination.

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7.70 Reporting the Results of Examinations

7.71. Results of each examination shall be reported promptly to the Dean of the Graduate School on appropriate forms. Responsibility for submitting the results of a particular examination rests with the chairperson of the examining committee, but all reports must be acknowledged with a signature by the department Chair.

7.72. The student will normally be notified in writing of the results of a written examination within two weeks (exclusive of vacation periods) after completing the examination. With oral examinations, the student shall be notified as soon as the examining committee completes deliberations.

7.73. Should a student fail part or all of an examination, the examining committee may recommend that one re-examination be allowed, but the final decision whether or not to permit a second examination rests with the Dean of the Graduate School. If a re-examination is recommended, the examining committee must provide the student with instructions for remedying the deficiencies identified in the first examination. Any special conditions that the student will be expected to fulfill in preparation for a second examination must accompany the recommendation to allow a re-examination. No more than one re-examination will ever be allowed. If the second examination is failed, the student is no longer eligible to complete the degree program in which they are enrolled. Students failing a re-examination in a Master's degree program will not have the opportunity to complete a thesis-based or non-thesis-based Master's degree in that program.

7.74. A second examination, if permitted, may be taken only after a minimum of ten weeks has passed to allow for additional student preparation. In all cases, a second examination must take place before one year has elapsed. If the second examination is not taken within a year, no additional opportunity to take it will be given.

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