Go Global

URI student Kayla Lombardi '18, of North Kingstown, RI, interned with Audi in Ingolstadt, Bavaria, as part of her international business dual degree program
Kayla Lombardi ’18 obtained a paid internship with Audi in Ingolstadt, Bavaria, as part of her international business dual degree program. Photo courtesy of Audi Forum Ingolstadt.

While studying abroad affirmed Kayla Lombardi’s intended career choice, it also prompted her to take a broader view of what she might do professionally.

A supply chain management and German major in the International Business Program, Lombardi ’18 of North Kingstown, RI, credits her paid internship at the carmaker Audi in Ingolstadt, Bavaria, with reinforcing her interest in supply chain management. “We discussed port digitalization and worked on process improvement and design — areas I definitely want to go into,” she said. After URI, Lombardi may return to Europe to pursue a master’s in maritime logistics or go directly into supply chain management for the automotive industry.

URI’s dual commitment to prepare students for success in a global economy and to forge partnerships with universities and businesses worldwide has led to its affiliation with more than 200 different programs in over 60 countries. This year, the International Engineering Program celebrates its 30th year. And the past three decades have also seen the creation and growth of a great number of other study abroad programs that, together, offer all students at the University of Rhode Island the opportunity to expand their educational experiences as far as their imaginations take them.

International Engineering Program

Since 1987, the University of Rhode Island’s International Engineering Program has been grooming engineering students for global careers. IEP students earn two degrees simultaneously — a B.S. in engineering and a B.A. in a language: Chinese, French, German, Italian or Japanese (minor).

The program includes a year abroad studying at a partner university and interning at a prestigious engineering firm such as BMW, Bayer, Hasbro, Johnson and Johnson, or Siemens. More than 500 students have taken part in the IEP program since its inception.

International Computer Science Program

A computer science major enrolled in the International Computer Science Program commits to a five-year, dual degree program and earns a B.A. degree in a language in addition to their B.S. Languages they may choose to study include Chinese, French, German, Italian and Spanish. This adjunct to the International Engineering Program boasts the following features:

  • Language courses designed for computer scientists and engineers
  • Six-month paid internship with a company abroad
  • The option to study abroad at a partner university in Chile, China, France, Germany, Mexico or Spain

International Business Program

Offered by the College of Business Administration, URI’s International Business Program also augments its curriculum with study of language and culture, enabling students to earn two degrees: a bachelor of science degree in accounting, finance, general business, global business, entrepreneurial management, marketing, supply chain management, textile marketing or textiles, fashion merchandising and design, and a bachelor of art in Chinese, French, German, Italian or Spanish.

Opportunities to study at partner universities and to apply for international internships are also available. IBP students take internships with top-tier firms in Asia, Europe, and Latin America such as Audi, BMW, Deutsche Bahn, General Motors España, Hasbro Asia, Toray Films Europe, UniCredit and Volkswagen.

Still More Opportunities to Study Abroad

URI provides still more flexible study-abroad options for students in all disciplines. Among our offerings are the following:

  • Semester and short-term programs
  • Faculty-led and J-term programs
  • Cross-cultural and capacity-training programs
  • International internships
  • English immersion summer programs

For more information on study abroad opportunities, visit URI’s International Center.

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An older man carefully walks a straight line marked on the carpet while students assess his gait. In a room nearby, students review a woman’s medication use.